2008-09 Catalog 
    
    Oct 04, 2022  
2008-09 Catalog [Archived Catalog]

Courses


 
  
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    PSC 499 - Honors Research


  
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    PSY 111 - General Psychology

    (4 credits)
    General Education Requirement / Option: (general education option under social science)

    This course is an overview of the field of psychology and includes topics such as biological bases of behavior, learning and memory, motivation and emotion, human development, personality, intelligence, abnormal behavior and therapy. The course emphasizes methodologies including observation, correlational and experimental as they are used in the study of psychology. A major purpose is to have the student struggle with the question, “What is psychology?” Finally, this course provides students with the necessary background in psychology to move on to other more advanced topics in the field.

  
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    PSY 214x - Social Psychology

    (4 credits)
    This course involves the study of the way individuals think about, influence and relate to one another. Topics include: attitude change, social thinking, conformity, obedience, persuasion, prejudice, aggression, altruism, roles, norms and environmental influences on social behavior. The major aim of the course is to encourage an appreciation of the relationship between personal and situational determinants of social behavior.

    Prerequisite: PSY111, 221, or SOC101.

    Cross-Referenced: Cross-referenced in sociology.
  
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    PSY 215 - Research Methods I

    (4 credits)
    This course acquaints the student with basic empirical research techniques in the behavioral sciences including political science, psychology, social work and sociology. The course aims to enable the student to function as a conductor and a consumer of behavioral science research. Techniques include: observation, questionnaire and survey, interview, single-subject designs, qualitative research, and experimental and quasi-experimental methodologies. Topics include: descriptive and basic inferential statistics, sampling methods and research ethics.

    Prerequisites: PSY111, SOC101, PSC101, or PSC105, and fulfillment of the general education math requirement.

  
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    PSY 216 - Research Methods II

    (4 credits)
    Skills in statistical analysis and interpretation of psychological research are developed in this course with emphasis on correlation, regression and analysis of variance. Basic skills learned in Research Methods I are extended through practice in conducting, analyzing and reporting research using statistical software such as SPSS.

    Prerequisite: PSY215.

  
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    PSY 221 - Developmental Psychology: Childhood

    (4 credits)
    General Education Requirement / Option: (general education option under social science)

    The study of the physical and mental development of the child from the prenatal period into adolescence. The course includes the study of physical, cognitive, moral, social and personality development of childhood and adolescence.

  
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    PSY 224 - Developmental Psychology: Adolescence

    (4 credits)
    Adolescents experience many changes in a few short years as they transition from childhood to adulthood. This course explores the major psychological issues and theories in adolescent development with emphasis on cognitive development, self-concept, peer relationships and sexuality, among others.

  
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    PSY 225 - Developmental Psychology: Adulthood

    (4 credits)
    This course explores psychological issues and theories in normal adult development, with emphasis on cognitive, social and personality functioning from young adulthood to old age.

  
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    PSY 230 - Industrial/Organizational Psychology

    (2 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    This course covers the psychological issues of the work place such as personnel selection and development, organizational psychology and the work environment. The professional activities of I/O psychologists are examined including selection and the placement of new employees, staff training and development, performance management, organizational development, analysis of the quality of work life and ergonomics.

  
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    PSY 260 - Psychology of Personality

    (4 credits)
    Includes theories about the dynamics and structure of personality and current research on personality. The course emphasizes psychoanalytic, trait, humanistic and behavioral views of personality.

    Prerequisites: PSY111, 221, or both PSY224 and 225.

  
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    PSY 315 - Learning and Cognition

    (4 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    An introduction to the topics of learning, memory and cognition within the field of experimental psychology. An emphasis will be placed on approaching problems as an “experimental psychologist.” Advantages and limitations of the experimental approach and applications of the knowledge base of experimental psychology will be highlighted.

    Prerequisites: PSY111 and 215.

  
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    PSY 319 - Motivation and Emotion

    (4 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    Why do we do what we do? How do we know what we want and what we need? How do we set goals for ourselves and act to achieve them? These are some of the questions that the psychology of motivation and emotion attempt to answer. This course will examine universal and specific motivations and emotions in the context of physiological, cognitive and affective systems. It will also pursue applications of motivation and emotion to the psychology of addiction, health, coping and optimal functioning.

    Prerequisites: PSY111 and 215.

  
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    PSY 360 - Abnormal Psychology

    (4 credits)
    A study of the disordered personality including theories of causation, diagnosis and characteristics of disorders. The system found in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual IV of the American Psychiatric Association will be followed.

    Prerequisite: 4 credits of psychology courses.

  
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    PSY 390 - Psychology Seminar

    (2 or 4 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    A study of a selected topic.

    Note: The course may be repeated on different topics for a total of 8 credits.

    Prerequisites: PSY111 and four additional credits in psychology.

  
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    PSY 398 - Directed Study


  
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    PSY 402 - Introduction to Clinical Psychology

    (4 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    This course provides a first exposure to the theory and practice of clinical psychology. A major emphasis will be a review of the various theories of psychotherapy. The way in which these theories are applied within professional psychology constitutes a secondary, but strong, emphasis.

    Prerequisites: PSY111 and eight additional credits in psychology.

  
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    PSY 405 - History and Systems of Psychology

    (4 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    An overview of the history and theories which have shaped contemporary psychology. Particular attention is given to the assumptions and presuppositions underlying the discipline.

    Prerequisite: 12 credits of psychology courses.

  
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    PSY 406 - Psychology Research Lab

    (4 credits)
    As a culminating experience, senior students conduct a semester-long empirical research project and produce an APA-formatted report. This is substantive project that allows the student to individually explore a self-selected research topic in depth and to experience the research process from initial idea to finished publication-ready manuscript. It challenges the student to think creatively, to integrate knowledge and skills obtained throughout the psychology curriculum, and to produce a worthwhile contribution to the field.

    Prerequisites: 20 credits of psychology courses including PSY215 and 216.

  
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    PSY 417 - Internship

    (4 credits may apply toward the major)
  
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    PSY 418 - Christ and Psychology

    (4 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    This course challenges thoughtful Christians to be critical but genuinely appreciative of the increasing role psychology is playing in modern life. A sizeable literature has developed which focuses on the relationship between orthodox evangelical Christianity and the formal discipline of psychology. The course examines some of this literature and asks: How can a scientific psychology be compatible with a person-oriented Christianity? Can a better system of psychology be built on a different understanding of science?

    Prerequisite: at least one course in psychology.

  
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    PSY 420 - Directed Research

    (1-4 credits)
    Directed research involves students in research projects conducted under the supervision of department faculty.

    Note: Encouraged for those students with expectations of graduate study. With the approval of the department, students may register for more than one semester.

    Prerequisites: 8 credits of psychology, approval of the research director and the department chair.

  
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    PSY 499 - Honors Research


  
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    REL 110 - Introduction to Biblical Studies

    (4 credits)
    General Education Requirement / Option: (general education requirement under biblical and theological studies)

    This course is an introduction to the historical, literary and theological aspects of the Bible. The course surveys the central characters and events of biblical history, examines the variety of literary genres found in the Bible, and discusses key theological themes emphasized within the Bible. Students are introduced to methods of biblical criticism and interpretation that integrate skills developed in other disciplines. The entire Bible (both Old and New Testaments) is covered.

    Note: Does not count toward a religion major or minor.

  
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    REL 210 - Christian Spirituality

    2
  
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    REL 260 - Christian Ethics

    (2 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    A biblically based, theologically and historically informed study of both personal and social moral issues from a Christian perspective.

  
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    REL 262 - Introduction to Christian Theology

    (4 credits)
    General Education Requirement / Option: (general education requirement under biblical and theological studies)

    A survey of the major concepts of Christian theology, including the doctrines of Revelation, God, Christ, the Holy Spirit, Humanity, Salvation, the Church, and Last Things. While taught from a Reformed and evangelical perspective, students will be introduced to a variety of other theological viewpoints and Christian traditions.

    Note: Does not count toward religion major or minor.

    Prerequisite: REL110.

  
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    REL 280 - History of Christianity

    (4 credits)
    A survey of the development of Christianity from the apostolic period to the contemporary world. Themes examined will include the separation of Church and Synagogue, Christianity in the Roman Empire, ecumenical councils, missionary expansion of the church in Europe and Asia, monasticism, the church in the High Middle Ages,the Protestant and Catholic Reformations, Confessionalism and the Wars of Religion, Puritanism, Pietism, The Enlightenment, Christianity and European Colonialism, Revivalism, Modernism and Evangelicalism, modern missionary expansion, the ecumenical movement, and Christianity as a global religion.

  
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    REL 290 - Christian Witness

    (2 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    An examination of Christian witness as verbal proclamation (evangelism), as reasoned response (apologetics) and as a distinctive lifestyle.

  
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    REL 294 - Introduction to Christian Missions

    (2 credits)
    A general overview of the biblical foundations and historical evolution of Christian mission, with special emphasis upon the modern development of mission theory and practice.

    Prerequisite: REL262

  
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    REL 310 - Christian Spirituality

    (2 credits)
    A study of the meaning, purpose and practices of Christian spirituality as this has been understood in the Christian tradition. The course emphasizes the practice of spiritual disciplines and the relevance of spirituality in our contemporary world.

    Prerequisite: REL262.

  
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    REL 317 - Topics in Old Testament Studies

    (2 credits)
    A study of a single book or larger section of the Old Testament or a current area of critical inquiry concerning the Old Testament. Possible topics include, but are not limited to, the Pentateuch, the Historical Writings, the Prophets, and the Poetic and Wisdom books.

    Note: May be taken more than once provided a different topic is studied.

    Prerequisites: REL110 and sophomore class standing.

  
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    REL 322 - Topics in New Testament Studies

    (2 credits)
    A study of a single book or larger section of the New Testament or a current area of critical inquiry concerning the New Testament. Possible topics include the Synoptic Gospels, the Book of Acts, the Johannine Literature, the Epistolary Literature, the Apocalypse.

    Note: May be taken more than once provided a different topic is studied.

    Prerequisite: REL110 and sophomore class standing.

  
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    REL 328 - Biblical Interpretation and Theology

    (4 credits)
    An examination of the past and present methods and proposals for biblical interpretation and biblical theology. The course will analyze and critique various models for hermeneutics and theological interpretation and also assist students in constructing exegetical methods that are biblically based, theologically informed and culturally relevant.

    Prerequisite: REL110.

  
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    REL 370 - Calvin and Calvinism

    (4 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    A study of John Calvin’s INSTITUTES OF THE CHRISTIAN RELIGION, as well as a survey of other varieties of Reformed theology, including later Calvinism.

    Prerequisite: REL110

  
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    REL 375 - Topics in Theology

    (4 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    A study of one or more standard areas of theology, (such as the doctrines of Revelation, God, Christ, the Holy Spirit, Humanity, Salvation, the Church, and Last Things) from a classical as well as a contemporary perspective.

    Note: The course may be repeated for credit provided a different topic is studied.

    Prerequisites: REL110 and 262.

  
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    REL 382 - Religion in America

    (4 credits)
    Focusing on the Christian tradition, this course will examine the individual, institutions, movements and faith traditions which have shaped and contributed to the American religious experience. To understand both the variety of and unity within the pluralist religious landscape, the course will seek to evaluate the interrelationship between religion and the broader social, cultural and political aspects of the American experience.

  
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    REL 384 - Topics in the History of Christianity

    (2 credits, offered on demand or discretion of department, consult department)
    A historical study of a religious group, theological movement or important leader in the history of the Christian church.

    Note: This course may be repeated for credit provided a different topic is studied.

  
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    REL 385 - Topics in Religion

    (2-4 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    A study of an interdisciplinary area of religion, not sufficiently covered by other courses, in response to student or faculty interests.

    Note: This course may be repeated for credit provided a different topic is studied.

    Prerequisite: REL262 or permission of instructor.

  
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    REL 390 - World Religions

    (4 credits)
    General Education Requirement / Option: (general education option under cross-cultural studies)

    The major religions of India, East Asia and the Middle East are examined in the light of the Christian faith. This course emphasizes the interaction of religion and culture with a view to cross-cultural understanding. In-depth research into a specific culture and religion is required.

  
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    REL 392 - Topics in Missiology

    (4 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    A topical and selective study of major missiological themes, permitting students to read and reflect intensively upon the nature and challenge of Christian mission. Topics will vary from year to year. Sample topics might include Religious Conversion, The Finality of Christ in a Pluralistic World, Interfaith Dialogue, Contextualization, Women in Mission Yesterday and Today.

    Note: This course may be repeated for credit provided a different topic is studied.

    Prerequisite: REL294 or permission of instructor.

  
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    REL 398 - Directed Study


  
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    REL 417 - Internship

    (2 credits may apply toward the major)
  
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    REL 472 - Theology in Context Seminar

    (4 credits)
    A research seminar in which students will explore contemporary questions and issues in light of the Christian religious and theological tradition. Features the writing and presentation of a major paper, discussions, analysis and critique of research.

    Prerequisites:REL110, 262 and senior class standing.

  
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    REL 499 - Honors Research


  
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    SOC 101 - Principles of Sociology

    (4 credits)
    General Education Requirement / Option: (general education option under social science)

    An introduction to sociology, its major concepts, tools and perspectives. This course provides an understanding of societies, of culture, of major social institutions such as the family, religion, and education, of social inequality, and of social change.

  
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    SOC 110 - Contemporary Marriage and Family Living

    (4 credits)
    A study of the basic sociological theories of the family from a Christian perspective. Topics include: the structure and functions of families, historical and social changes, cross-cultural analysis, institutional and functional aspects of dating, courtship, marriage adjustment, gender roles, parenthood and child rearing.

  
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    SOC 202 - Social Problems

    (4 credits)
    A discussion of myths and facts leading toward an understanding of many social problems, such as sexual deviance, drugs and alcohol, health care and illness (physical and mental), crime and delinquency, violence, wealth and poverty, inequality of opportunity, work, aging, sex inequality, racial minorities and discrimination, education, family problems, war, pollution, ecology and population. Emphasis is placed upon difficulties in defining, critiquing and proposing meaningful solutions.

  
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    SOC 204 - Demography

    (2 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    An introduction to demography and human population studies. Comparisons and contrasts between the population of the United States and other developed countries and that of less developed countries. Interrelations of population, technology and resource use. Uses of demographic knowledge and research in business, teaching and government.

  
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    SOC 214x - Social Psychology

    (4 credits)
    This course involves the study of the way individuals think about, influence and relate to one another. Topics include: attitude change, social thinking, conformity, obedience, persuasion, prejudice, aggression, altruism, roles, norms and environmental influences on social behavior. The major aim of the course is to encourage an appreciation of the relationship between personal and situational determinants of social behavior.

    Prerequisite: PSY111, 221, or SOC101.

    Cross-Referenced: Cross-referenced in psychology.
  
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    SOC 218 - Deviance and Social Control

    (2 credits)
    This class focuses on a sociological understanding of deviance. We will explore how both culture and structure may shape the prevalence, definition and reaction to deviance. Various theoretical perspectives will be examined and discussed to see how deviance may be both understood and even perhaps predicted. Finally, a number of more “concrete” areas will be examined, to both see how the theory holds up in real life, and to deepen the understanding of deviance and attempts at social control of deviance.

  
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    SOC 272 - Selected Topics in Sociology

    (2 or 4 credits, non-yearly, consult department)
    A study of selected topics in sociology which are not adequately covered in other courses. Offered as a response to student or faculty needs or interests. Possible topics include: social change, social reform movements, the sociology of unconventional lifestyles, sociology of women, sociology of education, medical sociology, sociology of war and terrorism, and native American issues.

    Note: May be taken more than once provided a different topic is studied.

  
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    SOC 290 - Cultural Anthropology

    (4 credits)
    General Education Requirement / Option: (general education option under social science or cross-cultural studies. Cannot count toward meeting both requirements)

    An introduction to the study of humanity across time and space, comparing societies and cultures to identify likenesses and differences. The study of anthropology develops an appreciation for the diverse ways human beings have approached universal situations: relationships between individuals and groups, adaptations to physical and economic environments, approaches to the infinite. Western and non-Western cultures are studied, ethnographic fieldwork goals and techniques discussed, and problems of ethnocentrism and culture change addressed.

  
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    SOC 303 - The Criminal Justice System

    (4 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    A study of the development of, issues in, and new directions for, the American criminal justice system. Each step of the system is critiqued in terms of intended and unintended consequences as well as official and operative goals, and is related to a detailed discussion of various correctional treatment programs: prisons, halfway houses, group homes, community-based treatment programs, probation, parole and others. Those in the criminal justice career concentration should take SOC218 first.

    Prerequisite: general education writing requirement.

  
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    SOC 304 - Minority Groups

    (4 credits)
    General Education Requirement / Option: (general education option under cross-cultural studies)

    A study of racial and cultural minority groups in the United States and other societies emphasizing value systems, power relationships, forms of social organization, and cultural contributions. This course helps students develop an understanding of, appreciation for, and capacity to relate effectively with minority groups. Appreciation for heterogeneity is stressed. In-depth treatment of Hispanics and Hispanic culture in the United States.

    Prerequisite: general education writing requirement.

  
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    SOC 307 - Corrections

    (4 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    Evolution of and debates concerning community and non-community based correctional programs, relationships between correcting, reforming, rehabilitating, and punishing, tensions between protection of public safety and rights of the accused, evaluation of incarceration, probation, parole, diversion, alternate and restorative justice programs, issues in “proactive” and “reactive” debate.

    Prerequisites: general education writing requirement, SOC218 and 303.

  
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    SOC 309 - Sociology of Gender

    (4 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    An examination of the topic of gender, predominately using a sociological perspective. The study of gender from a sociological perspective develops an appreciation for how social structure, institutions and culture shape gender roles and the lives of those who play these roles - at the same time that gender roles shape culture, institutions and social structure. Attention will also be given to the “inherent or constructed” debate about gender roles, the role of the media in shaping gender, and the intertwining of gender and family, politics, work and religion.

  
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    SOC 311 - Sociology of Organizations

    (4 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    The study of simple and complex organizations with emphasis on business, political and religious forms. Emphasis is placed on the impact of environment, size, complexity, formalization, internal processes, power, conflict, morale and motivation, and the development of models and tools for organizational analysis.

    Prerequisite: general education writing requirement.

  
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    SOC 312 - Sociology of Religion

    (2 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    A sociological examination of the meaning and function of religion in human society. Gives attention to the development of religious organizations, the relationship of religion to class and politics, the nature of the sacred, dimensions of religiosity, and denominational diversity and evangelicalism in the United States.

    Prerequisite: general education writing requirement.

  
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    SOC 316 - Latin American Societies and Cultures

    (4 credits)
    General Education Requirement / Option: (general education option under cross-cultural studies)

    A general survey of the peoples, cultures, and societies of Latin America. Attention given to indigenous, European and African influences, geography, family structure, social class, race, religion, population characteristics and growth, urbanization, economic, political and social development, and Latin America’s relationship to the United States.

    Prerequisite: general education writing requirement.

  
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    SOC 317x - Native North American Societies and Cultures

    (4 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    General Education Requirement / Option: (general education option under cross-cultural studies)

    This course surveys the historical development of American Indian peoples, particularly during the period of contact and conquest by Euro-Americans and particularly in the trans-Mississippi West region of what became the U.S. Topics include pre-contact life, oral literature, Indian accommodation and selective adaptation to Euro-American societies, Spanish, French and U.S. Indian policies, Native American religion, Christian mission work among American Indians, activism by and on behalf of American Indians, and reservation life.

    Prerequisite: General education writing requirement.

    Cross-Referenced: Cross-referenced in history.
  
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    SOC 340 - Sociological Research

    (4 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    A comprehensive introduction to sociological research methods with emphasis on survey research. An opportunity for sociology majors or others to apply this methodology in the conduct of major research in an area determined in consultation with the instructor. Finished research reports will be considered for presentation at various sociological association meetings.

    Prerequisites: general education writing requirement, SOC101 or equivalent.

  
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    SOC 341x - Philosophy of Social Science

    (4 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    An in-depth study of the philosophical foundations of the social and cognitive sciences. Issues discussed include, e.g., a) laws and explanations in social science, b) objectivity and values in the social sciences, c) rationality, d) relations between different social sciences and the physical sciences, e) philosophy of mind.

    Prerequisites: at least one philosophy course. PHI202 or 342 may prove helpful, but not required.

    Cross-Referenced: Cross-referenced in philosophy.
  
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    SOC 351 - Ethnographic Research

    (2 credits)
    An overview of ethnographic methods, goals, and the theoretical assumptions underlying them. Ethnography, the description and analysis of human life or culture, is based on qualitative fieldwork. The goal is to understand the “native’s” point of view, to learn from people rather than study them. Students will have an opportunity to practice fieldwork methods and write a brief ethnography.

    Note: Preceding course recommendation: SOC290.

    Prerequisite: general education writing requirement.

  
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    SOC 398 - Directed Study


  
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    SOC 401 - Sociological Theory

    (4 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    The study of major theories and theorists, addressing such theories as functionalist, conflict, social exchange, symbolic interactionist, ethnomethodological/ phenomenological, and sociobiology. Emphasis is placed on how various perspectives impact and alter our understanding of reality, of causation, of the past, present and future.

    Prerequisites: general education writing requirement, SOC101, sociology major or permission of instructor.

  
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    SOC 417 - Internship

    (4 credits may apply toward the major)
  
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    SOC 499 - Honors Research


  
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    SPA 101 - Beginning Spanish Language and Culture

    (3 credits)
    Combined study of language and culture. Study of major social systems and themes of Hispanic culture. Elementary study of the language in a communicative context. Emphasis upon integration of developing language skills with cultural understanding and sensitivity in oral communication settings.

    Prerequisite: No previous study of Spanish, or placement by the foreign language placement exam.

  
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    SPA 102 - Beginning Spanish Language and Culture

    (3 credits)
    Combined study of language and culture. Study of major social systems and themes of Hispanic culture. Building on previously acquired ability in Spanish, elementary study of the language in a communicative context. Emphasis upon integration of developing language skills with cultural understanding and sensitivity in oral communication settings.

    Prerequisite: SPA101, or placement by the foreign language placement exam.

  
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    SPA 201 - Intermediate Spanish Language and Culture

    (3 credits)
    General Education Requirement / Option: (general education option under language)

    Combined study of intermediate language and culture. Study of primary sources in print, audio and visual forms to develop appreciation for the ways culture in general and the language’s culture in particular shape a variety of social contexts. Building on previously acquired ability in Spanish, continued study of language in a communicative context with considerable emphasis upon precision and expansion of linguistic skills.

    Prerequisite: SPA102, or placement by the foreign language placement exam.

  
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    SPA 202 - Intermediate Spanish Language and Culture

    (3 credits)
    Combined study of intermediate language and culture. Study of primary sources in print, audio and visual forms to develop appreciation for the ways culture in general and the language’s culture in particular shape a variety of social contexts. Building on previously acquired ability in Spanish, continued study of language in a communicative context with considerable emphasis upon precision and expansion of linguistic skills.

    Prerequisite: SPA201, or placement by the foreign language placement exam.

  
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    SPA 311 - Advanced Spanish Conversation

    (1 credit)
    The main goal of this course is to improve oral communication, which includes speaking as well as listening, comprehension. Since successful communication also involves cultural awareness of the Spanish speaker’s feelings, thoughts and attitudes, part of this course involves studying sources of these important underlying constructs.

    Note: Taught in Spanish. Course repeated a minimum of 3 semesters. Graded on a pass/no pass basis.

    Prerequisite: SPA202 or equivalent proficiency.

  
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    SPA 312 - Advanced Grammar and Composition

    (3 credits)
    Advanced development of writing skills and a review of difficult grammar concepts. Students will be expected to write in a variety of contexts. Emphasis will be on the writing process. The majority of the assignments will be completed in steps including multiple drafts. Additionally, students will be expected to review grammar and complete some grammar exercises.

    Note: Taught in Spanish.

    Prerequisite: SPA202 or equivalent proficiency.

  
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    SPA 314 - Introduction to Reading Hispanic Literature

    (3 credits)
    Advanced development of reading skills and strategies and an introduction to Hispanic literature and literary topics. Students will learn how to effectively read a literary text in Spanish. Attention will be paid to strategies for understanding context through vocabulary and grammar recognition. Additionally students will be introduced to the literary genres and cultural contexts of the texts they study as well as pertinent critical commentary.

    Note: Taught in Spanish.

    Prerequisite: SPA202 or equivalent proficiency.

  
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    SPA 325 - Oral Spanish Interpretation

    (3 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    An in-depth study of interpretation between Spanish and English, with both theoretical background knowledge and applied practice included. Specific topic areas covered involve legal, medical and religious interpretation.

    Note: Taught in Spanish.

    Prerequisites: SPA202 and one 3- credit 300-level course.

  
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    SPA 326 - Spanish Phonetics

    (3 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    An in-depth study of Spanish phonetics. Topics include techniques and rules of Spanish articulation, analysis of the sounds of vowels and consonants in Spanish and their differences from English pronunciation, syllabication, rhythm, stress, pitch and intonation.

    Note: Taught in Spanish.

    Prerequisites: SPA202 and one 3-credit 300-level course.

  
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    SPA 327 - Hispanics in the United States

    (3 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    A wide-ranging study of the current situation of Hispanics in the United States. After an historical overview, a thematic approach will be taken to better understand the role of Hispanics in the United States and their growing influence. Possible topics include demographics, voting tendencies, purchasing power, Hispanic media, religion, labor laws, immigration, Spanglish and bilingualism, among others. Using interviews and research, the course will conclude with a study of our Hispanic neighbors here in northwest Iowa.

    Note: Taught in Spanish.

    Prerequisites: SPA202 and one 3-credit 300-level course.

  
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    SPA 328 - Written Spanish Translation

    (3 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    This course is an introduction to the theory, methods, techniques and problems involved in basic translation. The first half of the semester will focus mostly on translating from Spanish to English. The second half of the course will involve general material from specific areas of life: popular culture, music, social sciences, education, business, medicine, the legal profession, etc., with translation exercises from both Spanish to English and English to Spanish.

    Note: Taught in Spanish.

    Prerequisites: SPA202 and one 3-credit 300-level course.

  
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    SPA 344 - Practicum in Spanish

    (2 credits)
    Designed for advanced Spanish students, this practicum gives students the opportunity to practice their Spanish on a daily basis in a Spanish speaking environment. Emphasis is placed on the development of oral communication, both speaking and listening. Placement opportunities include, but are not limited to, living in the Northwestern College Spanish house or with a Spanish speaking Hispanic family.

    Note: Minimum 14 week placement to receive credit. Graded on a pass/no pass basis. May be repeated. Up to four credits may be applied to the major.

    Prerequisite: SPA202. Enrollment through permission of modern foreign languages department.

  
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    SPA 351 - Survey of Hispanic

    (3 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    Literature from Spain A study of peninsular Spanish literature from El Cid to the present. Emphasis upon major literary movements and their representative masterpieces.

    Note: Taught in Spanish.

    Prerequisite: SPA314 or permission of instructor.

  
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    SPA 352 - Survey of Hispanic

    (3 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    Literature from the Americas A study of Spanish Latin-American literature from the colonial period to the present. Emphasis upon major literary movements and their representative masterpieces.

    Note: Taught in Spanish.

    Prerequisite: SPA314 or permission of instructor.

  
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    SPA 398 - Directed Study


  
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    SPA 417 - Internship

    (2 credits may apply toward the major or minor)
  
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    SPA 499 - Honors Research


  
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    SSC 308 - Methods of Teaching Secondary Social Science

    (2 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    The content, technique and materials for teaching social science at the secondary level (for economic, history, political science, social science and sociology majors).

    Note: Credit does not count toward the major.

  
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    SWK 140 - Introduction to Social Work

    (4 credits)
    This course presents a history of the social work profession and social work practice. It incorporates the major fields of social work and the concepts and theories needed to understand the social, cultural, political, ethical and religious context that provides the ecological framework of social work practice, and it enables a thorough understanding of at-risk populations and of the problems which social work must address. Included are visits to agencies and guest lectures by social workers from the field. A central concern is the Christian’s individual and collective responsibility for the health and welfare of fellow human beings.

    Note: Transfer credits will be evaluated on a course-by-course basis. No academic credit will be granted for social work courses taken in programs which are not accredited by the Council on Social Work Education. No academic credit will be granted, in whole or in part, for life experience or work experience.

  
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    SWK 210 - Social Work Interviewing Skills

    (1 credit)
    This course is designed to help students develop basic interviewing skills and techniques in the area of social work. This course will provide foundational skills in interviewing so that students can work effectively with individuals, families and groups from all diverse populations. Different techniques of interviewing and theoretical principles of interviewing will be investigated. Students will increase their practical skills through the use of an interactive learning environment and through intensive use of video feedback and role playing. This course will provide students with the necessary interviewing skills that are needed in the field of social work and other mental health careers.

    Note: Transfer credits will be evaluated on a course-by-course basis. No academic credit will be granted for social work courses taken in programs which are not accredited by the Council on Social Work Education. No academic credit will be granted, in whole or in part, for life experience or work experience.

    Prerequisites: PSY111 or SWK140 or SOC101.

  
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    SWK 220 - Research Methods II: Practice and Program Evaluation

    (3 credits)
    The purpose of this course is to prepare students to engage in qualitative and quantitative evaluation of their own practice and of programs in the human services field, as they prepare to become social work professionals. Practice evaluation content focuses on facilitating understanding of the practitioner’s impact on client systems on the individual, family, group, organization and community levels. Program evaluation content focuses on facilitating understanding of the comprehensive process of evaluation and the necessity of useful program design.

    Note: Transfer credits will be evaluated on a course-by-course basis. No academic credit will be granted for social work courses taken in programs which are not accredited by the Council on Social Work Education. No academic credit will be granted, in whole or in part, for life experience or work experience.

    Prerequisites: SOC101, PSY111, MAT090 or fulfillment of the general education math requirement, and PSY215.

  
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    SWK 230 - Topics in Social Work

    (2-4 credits)
    A study of selected topics in social work which are not adequately covered in other courses. This course would be offered as a response to student or faculty needs and/or interests. Possible topics could include: child welfare, grief and loss, crisis intervention, gerontology, disabilities, mental health, violence/abuse, health care issues and policy, international social work, substance abuse and diversity issues.

    Note: This course may be taken more than once provided a different topic is studied. Transfer credits will be evaluated on a course-by-course basis. No academic credit will be granted for social work courses taken in programs which are not accredited by the Council on Social Work Education. No academic credit will be granted, in whole or in part, for life experience or work experience.

  
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    SWK 231 - Human Behavior and the Social Environment I (HBSE I)

    (4 credits)
    HBSE I is the first human behavior course that focuses on interaction between an individual’s development and the functioning of groups, organizations and communities. This course is the foundation course in the human behavior and the social environment sequence to prepare baccalaureate students for general practice. It utilizes the person-in-the-environment perspective to integrate theoretical knowledge and research from the human, biological, psychological and social sciences in understanding human behavior. Human development across the life span within the context of the influence of ethnicity, race, culture, gender, social class, age, sexual orientation and disability is specifically addressed in an attempt to understand human behavior.

    Note: Transfer credits will be evaluated on a course-by-course basis. No academic credit will be granted for social work courses taken in programs which are not accredited by the Council on Social Work Education. No academic credit will be granted, in whole or in part, for life experience or work experience.

    Prerequisites: PSY111, SWK140, SOC101, or permission of instructor.

  
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    SWK 232 - Human Behavior and the Social Environment II (HBSE II)

    (4 credits)
    HBSE II is the second human behavior course that focuses on interaction between an individual’s development and the functioning of groups, organizations and communities. The goal of this course is to acquire a knowledge base in the generalist social work perspective as it relates to individuals, groups, communities and organizations. This perspective gives social workers the ability to apply theories of self-development, identity and value diversity, and adhere to the profession’s commitment to social and economic justice. Students will be challenged to apply the generalist practice of social work to understanding the social processes within groups, communities, organizations and society. Students will develop sensitivity to individuals, groups, organizations and communities by examining social and economic injustices as well as human diversity and cultures which will be utilized in capstone courses. Students will be challenged to develop a framework for how people groups form and how a sense of belonging develops within groups, organizations, communities and society. Another important element of this course is to link faith and learning in the context of dealing with groups, communities and organizations.

    Note: Transfer credits will be evaluated on a course-by-course basis. No academic credit will be granted for social work courses taken in programs which are not accredited by the Council on Social Work Education. No academic credit will be granted, in whole or in part, for life experience or work experience.

    Prerequisites: PSY111, SWK231, SOC101, or permission of instructor.

  
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    SWK 360 - Social Work Profession and Policy

    (3 credits)
    Building on practice theories and skills in work with individuals and families, this course introduces students to the procedures and process of social work policy development and analysis. The goal of this course is to provide students with the understanding of how social policy affects the profession of social work and provides them with the ability to analyze current programs and policies as they are implemented. This course will give students a solid foundation of the political process, the identification of social problems, the development and the implications of social policies to help members of our society. Economic and religious trends will also be examined. This course will assist students in acquiring skills to see the inadequacies, gaps and inequities in social policies in the past and present and help them develop critical thinking skills and a commitment to change.

    Note: Transfer credits will be evaluated on a course-by-course basis. No academic credit will be granted for social work courses taken in programs which are not accredited by the Council on Social Work Education. No academic credit will be granted, in whole or in part, for life experience or work experience.

  
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    SWK 370 - Theory and Practice I - Social Work Practice with Individuals and Families

    (4 credits)
    This course studies the generalist social work approach as applied to individuals and families. Course goals include introducing students to the knowledge base of social work practice and to generalist practice skills. It is also the intent of this course to enhance student appreciation for human diversity. Emphasis is on the application of generalist skills to diverse work settings and with multiple population groups-ethnic and racial minorities as well as sex and age-related groups. Class format includes lecture, discussion of required readings, role-play activities, and computer simulated exercises.

    Note: Open to social work majors only. Transfer credits will be evaluated on a course-by-course basis. No academic credit will be granted for social work courses taken in programs which are not accredited by the Council on Social Work Education. No academic credit will be granted, in whole or in part, for life experience or work experience.

    Prerequisites: PSY215, SWK140 and 231.

  
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    SWK 376 - Theory and Practice II - Social Work Practice with Groups

    (4 credits)
    Building on practice theories and skills in work with individuals and families, this course introduces students to social work practice with groups. The goal of this course is to provide students with content related to generalist social work practice theories and assist students in acquiring skills to work with groups.

    Note: Open to social work majors only. Transfer credits will be evaluated on a course-by-course basis. No academic credit will be granted for social work courses taken in programs which are not accredited by the Council on Social Work Education. No academic credit will be granted, in whole or in part, for life experience or work experience.

    Prerequisite: SWK370.

  
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    SWK 386 - Theory and Practice III - Social Work Practice with Organizations and Communities

    (4 credits)
    Building on practice theories and skills in work with individuals, families and groups, this course introduces students to social work practice with organizations and communities. The goal of this course is to provide students with content related to generalist social work practice theories and assist students in acquiring skills to work with communities and organizations. Students will be introduced to aspects of organizational structure, program evaluation and supervision.

    Note: Open to social work majors only. Transfer credits will be evaluated on a course-by-course basis. No academic credit will be granted for social work courses taken in programs which are not accredited by the Council on Social Work Education. No academic credit will be granted, in whole or in part, for life experience or work experience.

    Prerequisite: SWK370.

  
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    SWK 398 - Directed Study


    Note: Transfer credits will be evaluated on a course-by-course basis. No academic credit will be granted for social work courses taken in programs which are not accredited by the Council on Social Work Education. No academic credit will be granted, in whole or in part, for life experience or work experience.

  
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    SWK 416 - Fundamental Issues in Social Work

    (3 credits)
    The intent of this course is to introduce students to the philosophical issues related to social work practice. Areas of study include a critical analysis of the profession’s role in society, and the relationships between social work values, its ethical guidelines, its knowledge base and research, and its practice skills. The course concludes with an analysis of the ethical and non-ethical issues facing practitioners and the various approaches to resolving ethical dilemmas.

    Note: Transfer credits will be evaluated on a course-by-course basis. No academic credit will be granted for social work courses taken in programs which are not accredited by the Council on Social Work Education. No academic credit will be granted, in whole or in part, for life experience or work experience.

    Prerequisites: SWK140, 231, and 370, or permission of instructor.

  
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    SWK 418 - Social Work Professional Seminar

    (2 credits)
    This course is designed to complement the student’s field placement and provide a forum in which to discuss field experiences-work assignments, problems, and ethical and non-ethical issues. The goal for this course is to help students make systematic associations between theory and practice in working with different population groups in various work settings.

    Note: Open to social work majors only. Transfer credits will be evaluated on a course-by-course basis. No academic credit will be granted for social work courses taken in programs which are not accredited by the Council on Social Work Education. No academic credit will be granted, in whole or in part, for life experience or work experience.

    Prerequisites: SWK370, 376, and 386.

  
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    SWK 419 - Social Work Practicum

    (10 credits)
    This is a field course which gives students the opportunity to practice generalist social work skills in a professional setting. The field sites are diverse, ranging from child and family services to mental health, community development and school social work. Emphasis is placed on introducing students to diverse ethnic, racial, sex and age-related group lifestyles and orientations.

    Note: Open to social work majors only. Students should take this course in the semester immediately following SWK376, Theory and Practice II unless prior permission is received from the field placement director. Graded on a pass/no pass basis. Transfer credits will be evaluated on a course-by-course basis. No academic credit will be granted for social work courses taken in programs which are not accredited by the Council on Social Work Education. No academic credit will be granted, in whole or in part, for life experience or work experience.

    Prerequisites: SWK370, 376 and 386.

  
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    SWK 499 - Honors Research


    Note: Transfer credits will be evaluated on a course-by-course basis. No academic credit will be granted for social work courses taken in programs which are not accredited by the Council on Social Work Education. No academic credit will be granted, in whole or in part, for life experience or work experience.

 

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