2008-09 Catalog 
    
    Oct 04, 2022  
2008-09 Catalog [Archived Catalog]

Courses


 
  
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    MUS 287 - Baritone Horn

    (1-2 credits)
    Private instruction is offered in keyboard, voice, brass, woodwind, percussion and string performance.

    Note: Lessons are 30 minutes in length. Lessons are offered every semester and may be repeated. MUS252, Lead Sheet Piano does not count toward class or private instruction in piano requirement for majors or minors. An advanced student may elect to take an hour lesson each week in his/her major area of performance. Practice and repertoire requirements are doubled.

    Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

  
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    MUS 291 - Clarinet

    (1-2 credits)
    Private instruction is offered in keyboard, voice, brass, woodwind, percussion and string performance.

    Note: Lessons are 30 minutes in length. Lessons are offered every semester and may be repeated. MUS252, Lead Sheet Piano does not count toward class or private instruction in piano requirement for majors or minors. An advanced student may elect to take an hour lesson each week in his/her major area of performance. Practice and repertoire requirements are doubled.

    Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

  
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    MUS 293 - Saxophone

    (1-2 credits)
    Private instruction is offered in keyboard, voice, brass, woodwind, percussion and string performance.

    Note: Lessons are 30 minutes in length. Lessons are offered every semester and may be repeated. MUS252, Lead Sheet Piano does not count toward class or private instruction in piano requirement for majors or minors. An advanced student may elect to take an hour lesson each week in his/her major area of performance. Practice and repertoire requirements are doubled.

    Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

  
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    MUS 295 - Flute

    (1-2 credits)
    Private instruction is offered in keyboard, voice, brass, woodwind, percussion and string performance.

    Note: Lessons are 30 minutes in length. Lessons are offered every semester and may be repeated. MUS252, Lead Sheet Piano does not count toward class or private instruction in piano requirement for majors or minors. An advanced student may elect to take an hour lesson each week in his/her major area of performance. Practice and repertoire requirements are doubled.

    Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

  
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    MUS 297 - Bassoon

    (1-2 credits)
    Private instruction is offered in keyboard, voice, brass, woodwind, percussion and string performance.

    Note: Lessons are 30 minutes in length. Lessons are offered every semester and may be repeated. MUS252, Lead Sheet Piano does not count toward class or private instruction in piano requirement for majors or minors. An advanced student may elect to take an hour lesson each week in his/her major area of performance. Practice and repertoire requirements are doubled.

    Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

  
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    MUS 301 - Basic Conducting

    (2 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    This course is designed to assist students in developing a basic conducting technique. Skills are taught which enable the student to direct vocal and instrumental groups. Included in the course are studies in transposition, clef reading and score preparation.

    Prerequisite: MUS112.

  
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    MUS 302 - Advanced Conducting

    (3 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    This course is designed to further develop the student’s basic conducting skills. The student will learn how to interpret stylistically the intentions of a composer and how to rehearse effectively. Compositions for band, choir and orchestra are studied. Included in the course are studies in score preparation, clef reading, transposition, rehearsal techniques, and error detection.

    Prerequisite: MUS301.

  
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    MUS 303 - Orchestration

    (2 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    This course provides the students with the principles of scoring for small string and wind ensembles, symphonic orchestra and symphonic band. The study of range, proper notation, transposition and the characteristics of orchestra and band instruments are included.

    Prerequisite: MUS112.

  
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    MUS 307 - Teaching Elementary Vocal Music

    (2 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    This course is designed to prepare students who are music majors or minors for teaching in the elementary school. Students, who anticipate becoming specialists, will learn how to teach music to children through traditional methods, as well as through innovations of leading European and American educators. Students will learn how to establish curriculum’s for music education that utilize learning strategies encompassed by the conceptual approach. State INTASC Standards, as well as National Music Standards, will be reviewed and applied. Four areas of musical study will be emphasized: historical, philosophical, content and methodology. Students will do guided practice in class teaching assignments.

    Prerequisite: MUS112.

  
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    MUS 308 - Teaching Secondary Vocal Music

    (2 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    This course deals with the areas of curriculum, materials and methodology for teaching music in both non-performance and performance situations.

    Prerequisite: MUS112.

  
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    MUS 309 - Teaching Instrumental Music

    (2 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    This course deals with techniques, literature and materials used for teaching instrumental music at the elementary and secondary levels. A primary emphasis of the course is the study of educational philosophy. Score reading and analysis of wind, percussion and string music, discussion of rehearsal procedures, and the study and observation of marching band techniques are also covered in the course.

  
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    MUS 312 - Counterpoint

    (2 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    The study of species counterpoint and 18th century fugues.

    Note: This course is strongly recommended for all students anticipating graduate school.

    Prerequisite: MUS211.

  
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    MUS 317 - History of Music I

    (3 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    Music history courses present a summary of the chronological development of music in western civilization. Music from ancient times through the Baroque is covered.

    Prerequisite: MUS112 or permission of instructor.

  
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    MUS 318 - History of Music II

    (3 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    General Education Requirement / Option: (general education option under fine arts)

    Music history courses present a summary of the chronological development of music in western civilization. Music from the Classical era to the middle of the 19th century is covered.

    Prerequisite: MUS112 or permission of instructor.

  
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    MUS 319 - History of Music III

    (3 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    Music history courses present a summary of the chronological development of music in western civilization. Music from the late 19th century through the present is covered.

    Prerequisite: MUS112 or permission of instructor.

  
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    MUS 320 - World Musics

    (2 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    World Musics provides an overview of world music traditions and serves as an introduction to the field of ethnomusicology, giving special attention to the use of ethnomusicology in missions and the use of world musics in worship.

  
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    MUS 325 - Recital

    (1 credit)
    This course is to be taken along with one credit of applied instruction during the semester in which the degree recital is given. The student will be required to select music of representative styles and periods, research and write program notes, pass the pre-recital jury one month prior to the recital, and give the public performance.

    Note: Minimum recital length is 30 minutes for music education majors and 60 minutes for music performance majors. Course may be repeated.

    Prerequisite: junior class standing or after four semesters of applied study.

  
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    MUS 334 - Composition

    (1-2 credits)
    Private instruction is offered in keyboard, voice, brass, woodwind, percussion and string performance.

    Note: Lessons are 30 minutes in length. Lessons are offered every semester and may be repeated. MUS252, Lead Sheet Piano does not count toward class or private instruction in piano requirement for majors or minors. An advanced student may elect to take an hour lesson each week in his/her major area of performance. Practice and repertoire requirements are doubled.

    Prerequisite: MUS112 or permission of instructor

  
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    MUS 335 - Private Conducting

    (1-2 credits)
    Private instruction is offered in keyboard, voice, brass, woodwind, percussion and string performance.

    Note: Lessons are 30 minutes in length. Lessons are offered every semester and may be repeated. MUS252, Lead Sheet Piano does not count toward class or private instruction in piano requirement for majors or minors. An advanced student may elect to take an hour lesson each week in his/her major area of performance. Practice and repertoire requirements are doubled.

    Prerequisite: MUS302

  
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    MUS 337 - Choral/Instrumental Arranging

    (1-2 credits)
    Private instruction is offered in keyboard, voice, brass, woodwind, percussion and string performance.

    Note: Lessons are 30 minutes in length. Lessons are offered every semester and may be repeated. MUS252, Lead Sheet Piano does not count toward class or private instruction in piano requirement for majors or minors. An advanced student may elect to take an hour lesson each week in his/her major area of performance. Practice and repertoire requirements are doubled.

    Prerequisite: MUS112 or permission of instructor

  
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    MUS 398 - Directed Study


  
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    MUS 401 - Music Ministry Practicum

    (2 credits)
    At the conclusion of the music ministry major course work, the student will be placed in a local church to gain hands on experience in the field. Through the practicum the student will further refine areas of strength, be introduced to a broad array of worship ministries and develop skills in organization and planning. The ministry activities and church situation will vary depending on the student’s strengths, performance background and career focus.

    Prerequisites: all course requirements for the music ministry major.

  
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    MUS 412 - Special Topics in Music

    (2 credits, non- yearly, consult department)
    This course provides in-depth study of special topics in music. Students will look at philosophical and practical issues in music within society and various cultures. Students will explore questions in theoretical, theological, historical, and performance approaches to music.

    Prerequisite: MUS318 or permission of instructor.

  
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    MUS 420 - Chamber Opera

    (1/2 credit, non- yearly, consult department)
    The study of a selected chamber opera (operas) scene(s) from all periods. The course will involve rehearsal and performance. Students will present their product in the context of recitals or performances.

    Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

  
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    MUS 499 - Honors Research


  
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    NSC 308 - Methods of Teaching Secondary Natural Science

    (2 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    A study of the techniques and materials for teaching natural science at the secondary school level (for biology and chemistry majors).

    Note: Credit does not count toward the major or minor. Note: See also course offerings under biology, chemistry and physics.

    Prerequisite: upperclassman.

  
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    NUR 160 - Nursing: Discerning Your Vocation

    (1 credit)
    Based on a Christian worldview, this course considers dimensions of nursing specifically related to nursing as a human science, performing art and healing ministry. This exploration includes a historic, current and future perspective. Students reflect on their call to nursing and develop a success plan for completing their major. Current societal, health-related and professional issues are also explored. Learning experiences include lecture and directed discussion, journaling, interviews, one clinical observation with a practicing nurse, guest lectures, multimedia learning technology and library research.

  
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    NUR 220 - Nursing and Shalom

    (2 credits)
    Based on a Christian worldview, this course investigates the theoretical, scientific and ethical foundation of nursing as a human science, performing art and healing ministry to promote shalom (health, peace and wholeness from a Biblical perspective) and social justice. The program’s mission, philosophy, conceptual framework and program outcomes are examined. Service-learning experiences, faith reflection and the creation of an electronic portfolio are integrated in meeting course objectives.

    Prerequisite: Acceptance into the nursing education program.

  
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    NUR 260 - Fundamentals of Nursing

    (3 credits)
    Based on a Christian worldview and the framework of nursing as a healing ministry, human science and performing art, this course provides the foundation for application of the nursing process with diverse pediatric and adult clients in acute and chronic illness. On-campus laboratory precedes clinical experiences and, to promote shalom, these experiences provide opportunity to develop knowledge and beginning nursing aptitudes in intervening with the care of individual clients across the lifespan.

    Prerequisites: NUR220, BIO203, PHI214, and REL110. Concurrent requisites: NUR280 and 290.

  
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    NUR 280 - Lifespan Health Assessment

    (3 credits)
    Based on a Christian worldview, this course provides an opportunity for students to develop their understanding and use of the nursing process, with a focus on the relationship development and assessment phases. Emphasis is placed on performing holistic assessment of pediatric and adult clients including the physiological, psychological, sociocultural, spiritual and moral/ethical dimensions. Laboratory practice precedes clinical application in a variety of health care and community settings. In the clinical component, students develop aptitudes in relationship development and holistic assessment of pediatric and adult individual clients to develop clinical judgment and promote shalom.

    Prerequisite: NUR220. Concurrent requisites: NUR260 and 290.

  
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    NUR 290 - Promoting Shalom with Older Adults

    (3 credits)
    Based on a Christian worldview, this course explores multidimensional aging processes and the holistic health experience of older individuals from the perspective of a Christian worldview. Emphasis is placed on nursing as a healing ministry, human science and performing art to promote shalom with older adults. Application of the nursing process in health promotion and care of common geriatric care concerns is accentuated. Service- earning experiences, faith reflection, and literature and the arts are integrated as strategies to more fully understand (a) the experience of older adults with diverse backgrounds, and (b) personal values, attitudes, practices and ethics, as well as those evident in government policies, community planning and the health care and social service delivery system. The clinical component provides an opportunity for nursing practice in community-based and acute care settings with older adult clients, assisting students to integrate knowledge, aptitudes and compassionate care in health promotion, restoration and maintenance, and living the three nursing practice dimensions (illuminating meaning, synchronizing rhythms and participating in transcendence).

    Prerequisites: NUR220 and BIO203. Concurrent requisites: NUR260 and 280.

  
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    NUR 320 - Promoting Shalom with Ill Clients

    (6 credits)
    Based on a Christian worldview, this course examines the theoretical, scientific and ethical basis for the application of the nursing process with diverse clients in their experience of health and illness across the lifespan. Emphasis is placed on nursing as a human science, performing art and healing ministry to promote shalom with children and adults. The clinical component provides an opportunity for nursing practice in acute care and selected community-based settings, assisting students to integrate knowledge, aptitudes and Christ-like compassion in all levels of prevention, with a focus on health restoration and in living the three practice dimensions.

    Prerequisites: NUR220, 260, 280, 290, BIO320 and PSY225. Concurrent requisite: BIO360.

  
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    NUR 350 - Promoting Shalom with Cross-cultural Populations

    (1 credit)
    Based on a Christian worldview, this 1- credit seminar examines transcultural nursing theory from a theoretical, scientific and ethical perspective, along with logistics for the in-country experience, dimensions of global health care and social justice. Emphasis is placed on cultural values, beliefs, norms and practices and their influence on the lived experience of health and illness. The in-country experience provides students opportunities to explore and engage another culture and participate in the nursing and health care delivery system. Emphasis is placed on nursing as a human science, performing art and healing ministry to promote shalom with diverse clients in acute care and/or community- based settings. Learning experiences include service-learning, experiential learning and faith reflection.

    Note: Course is completed prior to enrollment in GEN350.

    Prerequisites: NUR320, PHI114 and REL262. Concurrent requisites: NUR360 and 380.

  
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    NUR 360 - Promoting Shalom with the Childbearing Family

    (3 credits)
    Based on a Christian worldview, this course examines the theoretical, scientific and ethical basis for the application of the nursing process with diverse normal and high-risk childbearing families. Emphasis is placed on nursing as a human science, performing art and healing ministry to promote shalom with parents and children. The clinical component provides an opportunity for nursing practice in acute care and selected community-based settings, assisting students to integrate knowledge, aptitudes and compassionate care in health promotion and restoration activities and in living the three nursing practice dimensions. Learning experiences include service-learning, faith reflection, laboratory practicum and clinical experiences.

    Prerequisite: NUR320. Concurrent requisites: NUR350 and 380.

  
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    NUR 380 - Promoting Shalom and Mental Health

    (3 credits)
    Based on a Christian worldview, this course examines the theoretical, scientific and ethical basis for the application of the nursing process in promoting shalom with diverse individuals across the lifespan who are experiencing mental illness. Emphasis is placed on nursing as a healing ministry, human science and performing art to promote shalom with pediatric and adult mental health clients in acute and community- based settings. The person is considered from a holistic perspective and application of the nursing process utilizing all levels of prevention is emphasized, with a focus on the therapeutic use of self, health restoration and maintenance. The clinical component provides an opportunity for mental health nursing practice in institutional and selected community-based settings, assisting students to integrate knowledge, aptitudes and compassionate care in living the three nursing practice dimensions.

    Prerequisites: NUR320 and PSY360. Concurrent requisites: NUR350 and 360.

  
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    NUR 420 - Nursing Science and Informatics

    (4 credits)
    Based on a Christian worldview, this course examines the epistemological (theoretical, scientific and ethical) foundation of nursing as a human science, specifically as an approach to promote shalom and social justice. It surveys the types, methods and uses of research and informatics to enhance client outcomes and to deliver holistic nursing care for all clients and at all levels of prevention. The course emphasizes the knowledge and aptitudes needed by profession nurses to manage and utilize health care information and related technologies, critically evaluate research studies and integrate evidence in all phases of the nursing process. In the practicum, students analyze a variety of health care technologies and present an evidence-based practice project.

    Prerequisites: Nursing major with senior class standing and MAT208. Concurrent requisite: NUR440.

  
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    NUR 440 - Promoting Shalom With Diverse Populations

    (5 credits)
    Based on a Christian worldview, this course examines the theoretical and scientific basis for the application of the nursing process with diverse families and groups in the community. All levels of prevention are considered,focusing on health promotion and maintenance. Grounded in a synthesis of public health and nursing science and arts, the course emphasizes nursing as a healing ministry, human science and performing art to promote shalom and enhance the health of the population as a whole. The clinical component provides an opportunity for nursing practice in the community, assisting students to integrate knowledge, aptitudes and compassionate care in living the three nursing practice dimensions with families and groups. Learning experiences include service-learning, faith reflection and clinical experiences.

    Prerequisites: Nursing major with senior class standing and NUR350. Concurrent requisite: NUR420.

  
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    NUR 460 - Nursing Leadership and Clinical Scholarship

    (5 credits)
    Based on a Christian worldview, this course explores the leadership, management, role development and clinical scholarship dimensions of professional nursing practice, with a distinctive emphasis on promoting shalom, servant leadership, social justice and sociopolitical change. Students will analyze the health care system at a microsystem, macrosystem and chronosystem level, focusing on national health care but also exploring global health issues. Foundational to this exploration is an analysis of the relationship of personal, professional and organizational values and ethics to health care leadership roles and activities. Clinical scholarship is emphasized as a moral duty of Christian nurses committed to continuing Jesus’ healing ministry. The practicum component provides an opportunity for students to observe (a) the role played by a nurse servant leader and (b) engage in a leadership project as a basis for clinical scholarship. Learning experiences include service-learning, faith reflection and practicum experiences.

    Prerequisites: NUR420 and 440. Concurrent prerequisites: NUR480 and 490.

  
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    NUR 480 - Promoting Shalom With Critically Ill Clients

    (5 credits)
    Based on a Christian worldview, this course expands the theoretical, scientific and ethical basis for the application of the nursing process with diverse clients who experience complex health problems across the lifespan. Emphasis is placed on nursing as a healing ministry, human science and performing art to promote shalom with children and adults in acute care and community-based settings experiencing life-altering illness. The clinical component, which includes a 120-hour preceptorship, provides opportunity for (a) beginning-level professional nursing practice in acute care and selected community-based settings, (b) the integration of knowledge from nursing and related disciplines in clinical decision- aking, (c) enhancing aptitudes in all levels of prevention, but with a focus on health restoration, and (d) practicing compassionate care in living the three practice dimensions.

    Prerequisites: NUR420 and 440. Concurrent requisites: NUR460 and 490.

  
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    NUR 490 - Living Shalom

    (1 credit)
    Based on a Christian worldview, this course explores finding one’s place in God’s kingdom for now and eternity, living vocation, integrating values and ethics in personal and professional realms and living shalom. Within this capstone seminar, students assess their knowledge and aptitudes related to the program outcomes and integrate them in their philosophy of Christian nursing. Supported by a vocation-based philosophy, the course also prepares graduating seniors to live their vocation, write the NCLEX-RN examination, secure their first professional nursing position and practice in their first nursing position.

    Prerequisites: NUR420 and 440. Concurrent requisites: NUR460 and 480.

  
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    PHI 200 - Introduction to Ethics

    (4 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    General Education Requirement / Option: (general education option under philosophy)

    An investigation of some of the main philosophical questions about ethics, such as the following: Does morality depend on religion? Is morality relative to culture? Why should I be moral? How do we go about answering moral questions? Is there a “theory” of morality? If so, what does that theory look like?

  
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    PHI 202 - Logic

    (4 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    General Education Requirement / Option: (general education option under mathematics)

    An introduction to formal logic. The aim is to enable the student to become skilled in the examination of everyday language for validity, soundness, and cogency, to acquire a basic knowledge of classical sentential and categorical logic, and to master proof techniques in propositional logic and the first-order predicate calculus.

    Prerequisite: C- or better in MAT090, an ACT math score of 20 or above (SAT 480 or above), or a passing score on the MAT090 placement exam.

  
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    PHI 204 - Mind, Knowledge and Reality

    (4 credits)
    General Education Requirement / Option: (general education option under philosophy)

    An introduction to the main metaphysical and epistemological questions of philosophy. Issues addressed include the existence of God, the problem of evil, the mind-body problem, knowledge and skepticism, and personal identity and resurrection.

  
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    PHI 208 - Philosophy of Religion

    (4 credits)
    General Education Requirement / Option: (general education option under philosophy)

    An introduction to some of the main problems in the philosophy of religion. Possible topics include arguments for and against the existence of God, the attributes of God, the problem of evil, and the relationship between faith and reason.

  
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    PHI 210x - Introduction to Political Philosophy

    (4 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    General Education Requirement / Option: (general education option under philosophy)

    This course introduces the student to philosophy by means of an examination of the main questions of normative social and political theory. It examines such matters as the justification and purpose of government, anarchism, justice, equality and human rights.

    Cross-Referenced: Cross-referenced in political science.
  
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    PHI 214 - Contemporary Moral Issues

    (4 credits)
    General Education Requirement / Option: (general education option under philosophy)

    A philosophical exploration of contemporary moral issues. Possible topics include abortion, euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide, cloning and stem-cell research, war and terrorism, capital punishment, famine relief, factory farming and experimenting on animals, and so on.

  
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    PHI 216 - Philosophy Through Film and Fiction

    (4 credits)
    General Education Requirement / Option: (general education option under philosophy)

    An introduction to some of the main problems of philosophy by a study of selected works of literature and films. Topics explored include appearance and reality, knowledge and skepticism, the mind-body problem, and what sort of life is worth living.

  
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    PHI 219 - Philosophy and Science Fiction

    (4 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    General Education Requirement / Option: (general education option under philosophy)

    An introduction to some central philosophical problems through the medium of science fiction.

  
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    PHI 221 - Philosophy of Law

    (4 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    General Education Requirement / Option: (general education option under philosophy)

    This course is an introduction to philosophy by way of jurisprudence, the philosophy of law. The course addresses such questions as the nature and limits of law, judicial review, the obligation to obey unjust laws, the relation of law and morality, and the objectivity of legal reasoning. A significant part of the course is an exploration of the concepts of causation in the law and legal responsibility as applied to the law of torts. Readings will include opinions from the U.S. Supreme Court and other Federal Courts.

  
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    PHI 225 - Ancient Greek Philosophy

    (4 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    General Education Requirement / Option: (general education option under philosophy)

    An introduction to the ancient Greek philosophical tradition, ranging from the Presocratics to the Hellenists but focusing on Plato and Aristotle.

  
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    PHI 226 - Medieval Philosophy

    (4 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    General Education Requirement / Option: (general education option under philosophy)

    An introduction to medieval philosophy, beginning with Neoplatonists and Patristics and focusing on figures such as Augustine, Boethius, Anselm and Aquinas.

  
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    PHI 227 - Modern Philosophy

    (4 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    General Education Requirement / Option: (general education option under philosophy)

    An introduction to the central figures in the philosophical milieu of the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries, focusing on thinkers such as Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, Kant, Mill, Kierkegaard and Nietzsche.

  
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    PHI 229 - Twentieth-Century Philosophy

    (4 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    General Education Requirement / Option: (general education option under philosophy)

    An introduction to some of the dominant philosophers and philosophical movements of the 20th century.

  
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    PHI 238 - Philosophy of the Arts

    (4 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    General Education Requirement / Option: (general education option under philosophy)

    A study of major theories of the analysis and evaluation of art.

  
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    PHI 240 - Minds and Machines

    (4 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    General Education Requirement / Option: (general education option under philosophy)

    This course introduces some of the main problems of philosophy by exploring questions that arise from computer technology. Topics examined include what it is to be a person, humans as the Image of God, the human mind as a computer, artificial intelligence, virtual reality and transhumanism.

  
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    PHI 244 - C.S. Lewis and the Inklings

    (4 credits, non- yearly, consult department)
    An exploration of the philosophical themes found in the writings of the Christian writing group “the Inklings,” focusing heavily on the fiction of C.S. Lewis.

  
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    PHI 250 - Special Topics

    (2 or 4 credits, non- yearly, consult department)
    A study of special topics in philosophy which are not adequately covered in other courses as a response to student or faculty needs or interests.

    Note: May be taken more than once for credit provided that a different topic is studied.

  
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    PHI 310x - Themes in Political Theory

    (4 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    A critical analysis of classical and contemporary political theories, both secular and Christian. Special consideration is given to the issue of the relation between political philosophy and the practice of political science.

    Prerequisites: at least one philosophy course, 4 credits in political science, junior class standing, or permission of the instructor.

    Cross-Referenced: Cross-referenced in political science.
  
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    PHI 333 - Philosophy and Christianity

    (4 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    An exploration of some set of topics that lie at the intersection of philosophy and the Christian faith.

    Prerequisite: at least one philosophy course.

  
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    PHI 341x - Philosophy of Social Science

    (4 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    An in-depth study of the philosophical foundations of the social and cognitive sciences. Issues discussed include, e.g., a) laws and explanations in social science, b) objectivity and values in the social sciences, c) rationality, d) relations between different social sciences and the physical sciences, e) philosophy of mind.

    Prerequisites: at least one philosophy course. PHI202 or 342 may prove helpful, but not required.

    Cross-Referenced: Cross-referenced in sociology.
  
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    PHI 342 - Philosophy of Natural Science

    (4 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    This course will help one understand the natural sciences by examining a number of issues as they arise in the history of science. Issues discussed include: e.g., a) what distinguishes science from non-science? b) how are scientific theories justified? c) what is the role of values in scientific inquiry? d) what is required in ascientific explanation? e) do science and religion conflict? f) what is involved in a comprehensive scientific worldview? Representative thinkers include, e.g., Isaac Newton, Pierre Duhem, Ernst Mach, Karl Popper, Thomas Kuhn.

    Prerequisite: at least one philosophy course. PHI202 is helpful, but not required.

  
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    PHI 350 - Special Topics

    (2 or 4 credits, non- yearly, consult department)
    A study of special topics in philosophy which are not adequately covered in other courses.

    Note: May cover, for instance, timely topics which yet do not merit a permanent place in the curriculum. May be taken more than once provided a different topic is studied.

    Prerequisites: two philosophy courses.

    When Offered: Offered as a response to student or faculty needs or interests.
  
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    PHI 355 - Topics in Ethics

    (4 credits, non- yearly, consult department)
    An advanced study of some topic(s) in ethics.

    Prerequisite: PHI110 or 114.

  
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    PHI 398 - Directed Study


  
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    PHI 417 - Internship

    (2 credits may apply toward the major)
  
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    PHI 450 - Senior Thesis

    (2 credits, non- yearly, consult department)
    Students will write a senior thesis in philosophy under the direction of one of the philosophy faculty.

    Prerequisites: philosophy major or minor, senior class standing.

  
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    PHI 499 - Honors Research


  
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    PHY 101 - Conceptual Physics

    (3 credits)
    The course includes a study of linear and non-linear motion, Newton’s Laws of Motion, momentum, energy, properties of matter, heat, sound, electricity and magnetism, light, and atomic and nuclear physics. These topics are studied in a conceptual manner that includes little mathematics (beginning high school algebra level). The historical perspective on these concepts and the way in which they were developed is included.

  
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    PHY 107 - The Physics of Everyday Life

    (4 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    General Education Requirement / Option: (general education option under natural science)

    A one-semester physics course for students seeking a physical science course to fulfill their natural science general education requirement and those students needing a one-semester physics course for a graduate school program. The primary goal of the course is to introduce students to the basic principles of physics that are at work in creation, as well as how they have been implemented technologically. Specific topics may vary somewhat, but will always focus on the foundational aspects of physics: mechanics, electromagnetism, wave behavior and thermodynamics. There will be some discussion of the historical development of physics and its relationship to faith.

    Note: There is a laboratory component to this course.

    Prerequisite: MAT108 or higher, or ACT math score of 24 or better (SAT 550 or above), or consent of department chair.

  
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    PHY 111 - General Physics I

    (4 credits)
    General Education Requirement / Option: (general education option under natural science)

    For students in mathematics, the physical sciences, and those students seeking candidacy to a medical school or other graduate program. Topics will include kinematics, Newtonian mechanics, energy, momentum and thermodynamics.

    Note: There is a laboratory component to this course.

    Prerequisite: MAT108 or higher, or ACT math score of 24 or better (SAT 550 or above), or consent of department chair.

  
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    PHY 112 - General Physics II

    (4 credits)
    A continuation of General Physics I. Topics will include simple harmonic oscillation, mechanical and electromagnetic waves, electromagnetism and modern physics.

    Note: There is a laboratory component to this course.

    Prerequisite: successful completion of PHY111 with a grade of C- or better, or consent of department chair.

  
  •  

    PHY 211 - Classical Physics I

    (4 credits)
    General Education Requirement / Option: (general education option under natural science)

    For students in mathematics, the physical sciences, and those students seeking candidacy to a medical school or other graduate program. Topics will include kinematics, Newtonian mechanics, energy, momentum, and thermodynamics.

    Note: There is a laboratory component to this course.

    Prerequisite: MAT112 or higher, or consent of department chair, MAT112 may be taken concurrently.

  
  •  

    PHY 212 - Classical Physics II

    (4 credits)
    A continuation of Classical Physics I. Topics will include simple harmonic oscillation, mechanical and electromagnetic waves, and electromagnetism.

    Note: There is a laboratory component to this course.

    Prerequisite: successful completion of PHY211 with a grade of C- or better.

  
  •  

    PHY 213 - Electronics and Instrumentation

    (3 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    For students seeking a minor in physics. Topics will include analog and digital electronics components, basic analog and digital theory of circuit operation, and interfacing recording instruments to experimental apparatus.

    Prerequisite: PHY212 or permission of department chair.

  
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    PHY 231 - Engineering Statics

    (3 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    Primarily for pre-engineering students. Topics include vector and scalar treatment of coplanar and noncoplanar force systems, resultants, equilibrium, friction,centroids, second movements, Mohr’s circle, radius of gyration, internal forces, shear, and bending diagrams.

    Prerequisite: PHY211.

  
  •  

    PHY 250 - Special Topics

    (2 or 4 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    A study of topics in physics which are not fully covered in other courses.

    Note: May be repeated provided a different topic is studied.

    Prerequisites: PHY111, 112 or 211, 212.

    When Offered: Offered to accommodate student or faculty interests.
  
  •  

    PHY 370 - Modern Physics

    (4 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    For students seeking a minor in physics or those interested in obtaining a physics teaching endorsement. Topics will include special relativity, quantized energy and momentum, Schrodinger’s Equation, nuclear and particle physics, and cosmology.

    Note: There is a laboratory component to this course.

    Prerequisites: successful completion of PHY212 with a grade of C- or higher, or permission of instructor.

  
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    PHY 398 - Directed Study


  
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    PHY 417 - Internship


  
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    PHY 433x - Introductory Physical Chemistry

    (4 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    An introductory course in chemical thermodynamics, quantum chemistry and chemical kinetics.

    Note: Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory period per week.

    Prerequisites: MAT112 and 211, and CHE112 or PHY212.

    Cross-Referenced: Cross-referenced in chemistry.
  
  •  

    PHY 436x - Intermediate Physical Chemistry

    (4 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    An intermediate course in chemical thermodynamics, quantum chemistry and chemical kinetics.

    Note: Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory period per week.

    Prerequisite: PHY433x.

    Cross-Referenced: Cross-referenced in chemistry.
  
  •  

    PHY 499 - Honors Research


  
  •  

    PSC 101 - American National Government

    (4 credits)
    General Education Requirement / Option: (general education option under social science) (American politics)

    A broad survey of the major political and governmental institutions in the United States. This course examines how citizens attempt to influence their government and how the government responds. The course also develops the foundations for a biblical perspective on the role of government and the role of citizens.

  
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    PSC 105 - Political Ideologies

    (4 credits)
    General Education Requirement / Option: (general education option under social science) (American politics)

    A survey of contemporary political ideologies such as liberalism, conservatism, socialism, and others. Students will seek to understand the relevance of these ideologies for public policy, and will seek to develop a Christian perspective on, and critique of, contemporary ideologies.

  
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    PSC 201 - State and Local Government

    (2 credits)
    General Education Requirement / Option: (American politics)

    Note: This course examines the political relationships between the federal, state and local levels of U.S. government. Though we focus primarily on state and local governments and policy making, we also seek to determine which level of government is best suited to address the different social and economic problems. The role of the Christian in politics is also explored.

  
  •  

    PSC 210x - Introduction to Political Philosophy

    (4 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    General Education Requirement / Option: (general education option under philosophy)

    This course introduces the student to philosophy by means of an examination of the main questions of normative social and political theory. It examines such matters as the justification and purpose of government, anarchism, justice, equality and human rights.

    Cross-Referenced: Cross-referenced in philosophy.
  
  •  

    PSC 220 - Politics and Public Policy

    (4 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    General Education Requirement / Option: (American politics)

    A general examination of domestic and foreign policies of the United States. Education, health care, civil rights and economic policy are among the various polices explored. Particular attention is given to the differences between Christian liberal and Christian conservative policy perspectives of problems such as crime, discrimination, poverty, degradation of the environment and others.

  
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    PSC 225 - Introduction to Law

    (4 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    General Education Requirement / Option: (American politics)

    This course briefly surveys the landscape of the American legal system. Most of the course, however, is devoted to examining significant constitutional issues, such as government powers, civil rights and civil liberties.

  
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    PSC 230 - International Relations

    (4 credits,alternate years, consult department)
    An introduction to basic concepts in the study of the modern states system. We will study especially the problem of war and diplomacy in an “anarchical society.” In addition, we will explore some Christian perspectives on the theory and practice of international relations, especially the contested concept of sovereignty.

  
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    PSC 235 - Comparative Politics

    (4 credits)
    General Education Requirement / Option: (general education option under cross-cultural studies)

    A broad survey of politics, political change, political institutions and public policy in several selected countries from different continents. Contrasts with the United States are emphasized and special attention is paid to historical development, ideological, religious and social factors.

  
  •  

    PSC 260 - Cultural Geography

    (4 credits)
    General Education Requirement / Option: (general education option under cross-cultural studies)

    This course introduces the study of political, physical and cultural features of space and place around the world. Familiarity with major physical and political features of the world’s regions will be stressed. In addition, the course will raise various issues connected with the cultural aspect of geography, e.g., perceptions of place, changes in space over time, the interactions of human communities, the natural environment and patterns of human presence on the land.

  
  •  

    PSC 295 - Electoral Politics Field Experience

    (2 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    General Education Requirement / Option: (American politics)

    This course provides an opportunity to explore elections as the central mechanism of democratic accountability in American government, by means of supervised reading and reflective involvement in an election campaign.

    Note: Graded on a pass/no pass basis.

    Prerequisite: PSC101 or 201.

  
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    PSC 310x - Themes in Political Theory

    (4 credits,alternate years, consult department)
    A critical analysis of classical and contemporary political theories, both secular and Christian. Special consideration is given to the issue of the relation between political philosophy and the practice of political science.

    Prerequisite: junior class standing, or permission of the instructor.

    Cross-Referenced: Cross-referenced in philosophy.
  
  •  

    PSC 320 - Christians and the Political Order

    (4 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    General Education Requirement / Option: (American politics)

    This course centers on the implications of the Christian faith for Christians in the political order. We will explore historical and current Christian interpretations of the role of government in society, distilling biblical values which undergird them.

    Prerequisite: junior standing, or permission of the instructor.

  
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    PSC 325x - American Political Thought

    (4 credits, non-yearly, consult department)
    General Education Requirement / Option: (American politics)

    A survey of the historical development of American political thought with attention to significant American political thinkers from the colonial period to the present. Special emphasis will be given to the uneasy relationship between liberalism and democracy and the interaction between American political institutions and culture.

    Cross-Referenced: Cross-referenced in history.
  
  •  

    PSC 330 - Topics in International Problems

    (2-4 credits, non-yearly, consult department)
    This course explores a particular problem in international politics, using descriptive, theoretical and normative perspectives. Issues addressed may include war, ethics and foreign policy, and hunger. We will explore relevant Christian thinking to assess proposed solutions.

    Note: May be taken more than once provided a different topic is studied.

  
  •  

    PSC 340 - Topics in American Politics and Institutions

    (2 credits, non-yearly, consult department)
    General Education Requirement / Option: (American politics)

    An examination and analysis of one of the following three aspects of the American political system: the presidency, the Congress or political behavior. The latter consists of voting behavior and the role, character and political strength of interest groups and political parties. Each time the course is taught the student will be offered an opportunity to increase his or her understanding of one of these critical components of the American political system.

    Note: May be taken more than once provided a different topic is studied.

  
  •  

    PSC 350 - Special Topics

    (2 or 4 credits, non-yearly, consult department)
    A study of political themes or issues not fully covered in other courses in response to student or faculty interests.

    Note: May be taken more than once, provided a different topic is studied.

  
  •  

    PSC 398 - Directed Study


  
  •  

    PSC 417 - Internship

    (4 credits may apply toward the major)
 

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