2008-09 Catalog 
    
    Oct 04, 2022  
2008-09 Catalog [Archived Catalog]

Courses


 
  
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    ACC 215 - Principles of Financial Accounting

    (4 credits)
    This course covers the basic introduction to financial management and financial accounting, including an understanding of the concepts, principles and practices in these areas.

  
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    ACC 216 - Principles of Managerial Accounting

    (3 credits)
    This course covers the basic concepts, principles and practice in managerial accounting, including the use of accounting in management decision- making.

    Prerequisite: ACC215.

  
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    ACC 306 - Cost Accounting

    (3 credits)
    This course involves the study of cost systems and their use in decision-making by management. Emphasis is placed on the areas of cost-volume-profit analysis, job-order and process costing systems, budgets and standards, cost allocation and capital budgeting.

    Prerequisites: ACC215 and 216.

  
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    ACC 307 - Federal Tax I

    (4 credits)
    This is an introduction to current federal and state taxation laws and practices. The emphasis is on the federal income tax and its impact on accounting procedures and management decision-making.

    Prerequisites: ACC215 and 216, or permission of chair of the business department.

  
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    ACC 308 - Federal Tax II

    (2 credits)
    This course is a continuation of Federal Tax I. Special emphasis is placed on the taxation of corporations and its impact on management decision-making.

    Prerequisite: ACC307.

  
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    ACC 315 - Intermediate Accounting I

    (4 credits)
    This course is a study of the development of accounting principles and practices as they apply to financial statements. Emphasis is placed on the development of the theory used in accounting practice.

    Prerequisites: ACC215 and 216.

  
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    ACC 316 - Intermediate Accounting II

    (4 credits)
    This course is a continuation of the accounting principles and practices covered in Intermediate Accounting I. Special emphasis is on stockholders” equity and dilutive securities, special issues related to income measurement, and preparation and analysis of financial statements.

    Prerequisite: ACC315.

  
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    ACC 398 - Directed Study


  
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    ACC 415 - Auditing

    (4 credits; alternate years, consult department)
    This course studies the internal control procedures in modern business, the development of auditing standards and procedures, the theory behind the development of such auditing standards and procedures, and how these auditing standards and procedures are applied to the public accountancy field. Special emphasis is on the auditor”s decision-making process.

    Prerequisites: ACC315 and 316, or permission of chair of the business department.

  
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    ACC 417 - Internship

    (2 credits may apply toward the major)
  
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    ACC 418 - Advanced Accounting

    (4 credits; alternate years, consult department)
    This course is a study of accounting for partnerships, branches, segments, business combinations, affiliated companies, government entities and nonprofit organizations.

    Prerequisites: ACC315 and 316, or permission of chair of the business department.

  
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    ACC 420 - CPA Review

    (1 credit)
    This course will be a comprehensive review of all material for the CPA exam, using a computerized review package.

    Note: Graded on a pass/no pass basis.

    Prerequisites: ACC415 and 418, or permission of the instructor.

  
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    ACC 499 - Honors Research


  
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    AGR 201 - Animal Science

    (3 credits; alternate years, consult department)
    Designed to provide background in animal physiology including comparative characteristics and bodily functions of farm animals. This course also includes the livestock enterprise components of swine, beef, horses, sheep and poultry.

  
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    AGR 212 - Crop Production

    (3 credits; alternate years, consult department)
    Covers basic principles of crop production, emphasizing the production of corn, soybeans, sorghum, small grains and forages. The effects of soil and climate on plant growth and production is integrated into the various crops studied. Weeds and weed control are also included.

  
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    AGR 301 - Agricultural Marketing

    (3 credits; alternate years, consult department)
    Designed to provide exposure to the total agricultural marketing structure, with emphasis on market evaluation and decision-making. The cash market, local contracting, and the futures market are studied as tools in the development of an orderly marketing program.

  
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    AGR 302 - Agri-business Management

    (3 credits; alternate years, consult department)
    This course is designed to expose the student to management principles and techniques as they apply to the agri-business setting.

  
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    AGR 460 - Global Food Policy

    (3 credits; alternate years, consult department)
    This course analyzes the public policy formulation process U.S. and global food policies, and the impact of food policies on various groups of global citizens in both a historical and contemporary setting.

    Prerequisites: ECO213 and 214; junior class standing and completion of cross-cultural requirement.

  
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    ART 105 - Introduction to Studio

    (4 credits)
    General Education Requirement / Option: (general education option under fine arts)

    A course placing emphasis on the introduction to studio art media and learning the basics of two- and three- dimensional design. Art terms and concepts will be explained and essential vocabulary will be utilized. Basic problems of aesthetics and the nature of art will be explored throughout the course. Emphasis is upon learning creative problem solving using visual media. Art history is introduced in the course in the presentation of projects. Studio projects, discussions and criticism of art works are features of the course.

    Note: Does not count toward an art major or minor.

  
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    ART 120 - Art History Survey, Prehistoric Through Medieval

    (4 credits; alternate years, consult department)
    General Education Requirement / Option: (general education option under fine arts)

    A contextual world survey of developments in architecture, sculpture, painting, and other mediums from prehistory to the Gothic period.

  
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    ART 122 - Art History Survey, Renaissance Through Early 20th Century

    (4 credits; alternate years, consult department)
    General Education Requirement / Option: (general education option under fine arts)

    A contextual world survey of the development and evolution of various media including architecture, sculpture, painting, prints, photography, design, film and other mediums since the Renaissance.

  
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    ART 150 - Introduction to Art Therapy

    (2 credits; alternate years, consult department)
    This course is designed to offer students a didactic and experiential overview of the field of art therapy. Students will study the history,theory, and practice of art therapy processes and approaches as well as survey the populations, settings and applications of this unique therapeutic technique.

  
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    ART 164x - Photography I

    (2 credits)
    Taught as a medium of creative expression or as an art form and as a journalistic tool. Film processing and printing are taught as well as camera techniques, darkroom procedures and presentation of work for exhibitions.

    Cross-Referenced: Cross- referenced in communication studies.
  
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    ART 206 - Drawing

    (4 credits)
    Drawing will emphasize learning how to perceive the three- dimensional world and render it on paper using the most simple and direct drawing media. Drawing will form the foundation of work in other media. Design fundamentals will be a significant part of the course.

    Note: Class critiques are used to learn formal vocabulary, find content in drawings and understand fine art.

  
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    ART 211 - Art for Elementary Education

    (2 credits)
    Methodology of teaching art concepts to elementary school children integrated into the elementary curriculum. Studio projects, textbook study and lectures are included.

    Note: Does not count toward an art major or minor. This course is limited to elementary education majors who have been admitted into the teacher education program or by permission of instructor.

  
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    ART 215 - Ceramics

    (4 credits)
    The art of working with clay and other ceramic materials. Emphasis will be upon learning the fundamentals of three-dimensional design and achieving an understanding of clay as a unique art form. Techniques include hand-building sculptural and functional forms, and learning the basics of throwing on the wheel and glazing.

  
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    ART 217 - Sculpture

    (4 credits)
    Three-dimensional art. Emphasis upon the basics of three- dimensional design and how creative ideas are formed using a three-dimensional approach. Degrees of depth are explored ranging from drawing and relief to works in the round. Techniques include clay modeling, woodworking, plaster casting, metal work and construction with mixed media.

  
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    ART 220 - Graphic Design I

    (4 credits)
    Graphic Design 1 is an introduction to the computer applications used in the communication, design and publishing fields. There will be an introduction to graphic design problems and projects in order to learn how these applications all work together.

  
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    ART 230 - Design: Theory and Practice

    (4 credits; alternate years, consult department)
    Study of the language of visual art including the elements and principles of design. Emphasis on learning creative problem solving and activities that focus upon the making and criticism of design projects in response to specific problems. The ethics and stewardship of design, and its influence on society and culture are considered.

  
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    ART 242 - Printmaking

    (4 credits)
    (Intaglio and Relief) A course providing the student an opportunity to gain knowledge of the printmaking processes of metalplate etching and engraving, woodcut, linocut, lithography and monotype. The student will have the opportunity to give form to his/her ideas while discovering the graphic properties and potentials of each print process from drawing to the final print.

  
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    ART 244 - Painting

    (4 credits)
    Introduces students to the techniques of oil, acrylic and water color painting. Students will learn to understand compositional form and color relationships. Historical examples of painting are examined and different methods of painting are demonstrated. Class critiques are used to learn formal vocabulary and achieve an understanding of subject style and content in painting.

  
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    ART 265x - Photography II

    (2 credits; alternate years, consult department)
    The fundamentals of photography as an art medium and a journalistic tool are used to develop an individual style or method of composing and printing photographs. This individual aesthetic approach will be seen in all the work presented at the end of the course.

    Prerequisite: ART164x. Cross-referenced in communication studies.

  
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    ART 307 - Advanced Drawing

    (4 credits; non-yearly, consult department)
    Further development in the search for a personal approach to content in the students work utilizing traditional and contemporary drawing approaches. Students will develop form and content through a series of drawings.

    Prerequisite: ART 206 or permission of instructor.

  
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    ART 308 - Methods of Teaching Secondary Art

    (2 credits; alternate years, consult department)
    The content, techniques and media for teaching art at the secondary education level.

    Note: Does not count toward an art major or minor.

  
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    ART 315 - Advanced Ceramics

    (4 credits)
    A continuation of the creative development of both functional and nonfunctional forms using advanced forming processes. The formulation of clay bodies, glazes,and their preparation, testing and application are introduced. Students will learn to load and fire gas and electric kilns.

    Prerequisite: ART215.

  
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    ART 317 - Advanced Sculpture

    (4 credits)
    The development of and exploration of formal and conceptual approaches to sculpture. Issues in contemporary sculpture will be explored. Wood, metal, plaster and other mediums will be used along with less traditional approaches to creating work including the use of found objects, mixed media, performance and group efforts.

    Prerequisite: ART217.

  
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    ART 320 - Graphic Design II

    (4 credits)
    Graphic Design II is a courses for students to gain the understanding of what good design is and how to clearly communicate with it. Students will produce finished examples of graphic design with a specific use in mind such as advertising, public information, business communication, etc.

    Prerequisite: ART220.

  
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    ART 325 - Special Topics in Art

    (2 credits; alternate years, consult department)
    A course providing the opportunity to do a concentrated study in the field of art, art history and/or design.

    Note: May be taken more than once provided a different topic is studied.

    Prerequisites will be determined by instructor and department according to the topic of the course.

  
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    ART 331 - Art Since 1940

    (4 credits; alternate years, consult department)
    A survey of contemporary art and the art of the second half of the 20th century. The course will focus on studying the development of artists and their works by examining their works and identifying the artistic, social, political and philosophical ideas and events that may have been influential. In the process, artistic styles and movements will be defined and compared.

    Prerequisites: ART120 and 122.

  
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    ART 342 - Advanced Printmaking

    (4 credits)
    An opportunity for advanced students to work with their own directions in printmaking media. The course encourages development of an individual printmaking direction and to choose a single theme or focus throughout a series of prints in order to develop consistency and maturity.

    Prerequisite: ART242.

  
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    ART 344 - Advanced Painting

    (4 credits) Individualized courses and programs:
    This course encourages the student to develop an individualized painting style. A single theme is repeated throughout course projects in order to develop consistency and maturity. Students are expected to develop their own personal aesthetic and style.

    Prerequisite: ART242.

  
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    ART 398 - Directed Study


  
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    ART 417 - Internship

    (2 credits may apply toward the major)
    An internship to provide the student with opportunities to learn and to apply the knowledge, principles, and abilities gained from the curriculum. Opportunities are available in professional art studios, graphic design studios, galleries, museums and printing houses.

  
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    ART 499 - Honors Research


  
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    AUS 311 - Field Botany


  
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    AUS 312 - Insect Biology and Ecology


  
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    AUS 315 - Woody Plants


  
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    AUS 322 - Aquatic Biology


  
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    AUS 361 - Field Natural History


  
  •  

    BIO 101 - Introduction to Environmental Science

    (4 credits)
    General Education Requirement / Option: (general education option under natural science)

    An introduction to an understanding of earth’s basic life support systems, the impact of human activity on such systems, and the ethical basis and strategies for human response to environmental degradation.

    Note: Includes 1 1/2 hours of lab per week. Does not count toward a biology major or minor.

  
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    BIO 102 - Human Anatomy and Physiology

    (4 credits)
    General Education Requirement / Option: (general education option under natural science)

    An introduction to the structure and function of the human body.

    Note: Includes 1 1/2 hours of lab per week. Does not count toward a biology major or minor.

  
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    BIO 110 - Introduction to Life Science

    (4 credits)
    General Education Requirement / Option: (general education option under natural science)

    This course will explore life processes common to plants, animals, and protists; cell structure and function; biodiversity; an introduction to genetics; biochemistry and development; evolution and ecology. Laboratory exercises will help students explore each topic using the scientific method. Hypothesis forming, data analysis and reporting will be essential components of the laboratory. An accompanying text will introduce students to Christian perspectives on current issues in molecular genetics and evolutionary theory.

  
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    BIO 115 - General Biology: Molecular and Cellular Biology

    (4 credits)
    General Education Requirement / Option: (general education option under natural science)

    General Biology I emphasizes the unity of life, examining the processes common to living organisms, and introduce the diversity of life, examining unicellular organisms. This introduction will provide students with a basic understanding of macromolecules, cell structure and function, respiration and photosynthesis, the cell cycle, meiosis, the relationship between gene structure and function, mechanisms of evolutionary change and Christian perspectives on evolutionary biology.

    Note: Three lectures and 3 hours of laboratory work per week.

  
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    BIO 116 - General Biology: Ecology and Organismal Biology

    (4 credits)
    General Education Requirement / Option: (general education option under natural science)

    General Biology II is an introduction to organismal biology emphasizing the diversity of life forms. Representative organisms from the plant and animal kingdoms will be emphasized. Students will also be introduced to basic ecological concepts and Christian perspectives on stewardship.

    Note: Three lectures and 3 hours of laboratory work per week.

  
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    BIO 121 - Introduction to Human Anatomy

    (4 credits)
    An introduction to the anatomical structures of the human body. The focus of the course will be on structures of: cells, tissues, organs and organ systems. The systems studied will include (but not necessarily limited to) integument, bone, skeletal system (including joints), muscle, cardiovascular, nervous, lymphatic, endocrine, respiratory, renal, reproductive and gastrointestinal.

    Note: Includes 3 hours of lab per week as well as lab practical examinations using either dissected organs from an animal source or A.D.A.M. interactive anatomy. Does not count toward a biology major or minor.

    Concurrent requisite: CHE101 or 111.

  
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    BIO 122 - Introduction to Human Physiology

    (4 credits)
    An introduction to the physiology of the human body. The focus of the course will be on homeostasis and the function of: biomolecules, cells and tissues, organs and organ systems. The contribution of each of the following organ systems to physiologic homeostasis will be examined: nervous, muscle, cardiovascular, endocrine,respiratory, renal, reproductive and gastrointestinal.

    Note: Includes 3 hours of lab per week which will emphasize the measurement of organ system function. Does not count toward a biology major or minor.

    Prerequisite: CHE101 or 111; Concurrent requisite: CHE102 or 112.

  
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    BIO 201 - Bioethics

    (4 credits; non-yearly, consult department)
    A seminar which applies Christian perspectives to selected problems in the field of biology.

    Note: Does not count toward a biology major or minor.

  
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    BIO 201 - Ecology

    (4 credits)
    A study of the processes determining the distribution and abundance of organisms in space and time, their exchange of matter and energy with their environment, the measurement of these phenomena, and the application of ecological knowledge in the care of creation.

    Note: Course includes required field trips and 3 hours of lab per week.

    Prerequisites: BIO115 and 116.

  
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    BIO 202 - Genetics

    (4 credits)
    An introduction to the principles of heredity and their practical application.

    Note: Includes 1 1/2 hours of lab per week.

    Prerequisites: BIO115 or 116.

  
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    BIO 203 - Microbiology

    (4 credits)
    A study of the morphology and physiology of microorganisms with special emphasis on bacteria and viruses. Those organisms that have an economic or medical importance will be highlighted, and basic laboratory techniques will be stressed.

    Note: Includes 3 hours of lab per week.

    Prerequisites: BIO115, 116 and CHE101, 102 or CHE111, 112.

  
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    BIO 205 - Ecology

    4
  
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    BIO 212 - Invertebrate Zoology

    (4 credits; alternate years, consult department)
    A survey of the structure, function, classification and behavior of animals without backbones. Special attention is given to those which are parasitic in nature.

    Note: Includes 3 hours of lab per week.

    Prerequisites: BIO115 and 116.

  
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    BIO 221 - Human Anatomy

    (4 credits)
    A study of the gross structure of the systems of the human body.

    Note: Includes 3 hours of lab per week.

    Prerequisite: BIO102, 115 or permission of instructor.

  
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    BIO 222 - Human Physiology

    (4 credits)
    A study of the mechanisms by which the human body functions. Emphasis will be given to nerve and muscle function, and thereafter to hormonal control and the integrated systems that allow for respiratory, digestive, excretory and reproductive activities.

    Note: Includes 3 hours of lab per week.

    Prerequisites: BIO102 or 115 and CHE101, 102 or CHE111, 112 or permission of instructor.

  
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    BIO 250 - Special Topics

    (2-4 credits; non-yearly, consult department)
    Courses and topics not taught on a regular basis are assigned to this category. Extended field trips for which credit is offered also fall into this category.

  
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    BIO 280 - Vertebrate Zoology

    (4 credits; alternate years, consult department)
    Vertebrate Zoology is an in-depth study of the major groups of vertebrate species. Topics will include vertebrate taxonomy, classification and interrelationship. Comparative vertebrate anatomy, physiology, behavior, as well as life histories will be included.

    Note: Three lectures and 3 hours of laboratory work per week.

    Prerequisites: BIO115 and 116.

  
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    BIO 307 - Histology

    (4 credits; alternate years,consult department)
    A study of the microscopic structure of cells, tissues and organs in vertebrate animals with special emphasis on human tissues. An effort is made to correlate structure and function and highlight important pathologies.

    Note: Includes 3 hours of lab per week.

    Prerequisites: BIO115 and 116.

  
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    BIO 309 - Plant Taxonomy

    (4 credits; alternate years, consult department)
    An introduction to principles of classification of plants and characteristics of major plant families with emphasis on the plants of the Midwest. Includes field study and laboratory practice in identifying, collecting and preserving plants.

    Note: Includes 3 hours of lab per week.

    Prerequisites: BIO116 or permission of instructor.

  
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    BIO 310 - Cell Biology

    (4 credits; alternate years, consult department)
    A study of the structure and function of cells and of their subcellular organelles. Structural detail will be described to the level of macromolecular assemblages. Wherever possible, function will be described in terms of the molecular mechanisms that underlie biological processes.

    Prerequisites: BIO115, 116, and CHE101, 102, or CHE111, 112

  
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    BIO 315 - Immunology

    (4 credits; alternate years, consult department)
    The basis of the immune system throughout the animal kingdom is the ability to recognize “self” from “not-self”. This course will investigate the molecular and cellular mechanisms that allow organisms to recognize, control and eliminate such not-self entities as bacterial pathogens, foreign tissue grafts and even transformed cells.

    Prerequisites: BIO115, 116 and CHE101, 102 or CHE111, 112.

  
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    BIO 320 - Pharmacology

    (4 credits; alternate years, consult department)
    A survey of the pharmacologic basis of therapeutics beginning with an introduction to the principles of pharmacology. This is followed by a survey of the more important drugs used in medicine with emphasis on mechanism of action, clinical use, and adverse effects.

    Prerequisites: BIO222 and CHE101, 102 or CHE111, 112.

  
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    BIO 326x - Biochemistry:Proteins and Metabolism

    (4 credits;alternate years, consult department)
    A fundamental course surveying biomolecules, catabolism, bioenergetics and biosynthesis.

    Note: Includes 3 hours of lab per week.

    Prerequisites: CHE321 and 322.

    Cross-Referenced: Cross-referenced in chemistry.
  
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    BIO 327 - Biochemistry:Molecular Genetics

    (4 credits)
    This course focuses on the structure and function of nucleic acids. Topics include replication, transcription and translation of genetic information, and control of gene expression.

    Note: Includes 3 hours of lab per week.

    Prerequisites: CHE321 and 322.

  
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    BIO 330 - Topics in Ecology

    (2-4 credits; a minimum of 4 credits will be offered per year)
    Advanced studies of the function and structure of local ecological communities and/or life forms. Courses will emphasize the use of fieldwork, research projects and/or primary literature.

    Note: Course may include required field trips and 3 lab hours per week.

    Prerequisites: BIO205 or permission of instructor.

  
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    BIO 340 - Neuroscience

    (4 credits; alternate years, consult department)
    Introduction to the structure and function of the nervous system, emphasizing neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, neuropharmacology and aspects of neuropathology. Multiple levels will be explored from the molecular and cellular levels through brain and spinal cord networks that contribute to complex behavioral and cognitive function.

    Note: Includes 3 hours of lecture and additional laboratory work each week.

    Prerequisites: BIO102 or 221 or permission of instructor.

  
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    BIO 345 - Neuroscience and Persons Seminar (NAPs)

    (2 credits; alternate years, consult department)
    Interdisciplinary lectures, discussions and presentations related to the reading and critiquing of literature on selected topics in the area of neuroscience and persons. Student-led discussions and presentations (oral and written) will be emphasized. Possible topics include: artificial/machine intelligence, clinical neuroscience and neuropathology, cognitive neuroscience, neuroscience and Christianity, neuroscience of emotion, neuroethics, neuromodeling, neuroscience of mental illness, neurophilosophy, neurotheology and social neuroscience; consideration of NAPs-related student research may also be included.

    Prerequisite: BIO340 or permission of instructor.

  
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    BIO 350 - Special Topics

    (2-4 credits; non-yearly, consult department)
    Courses and topics which are of special interest to faculty and students but which are not offered on a regular basis may be assigned this number. Examples of such offerings would be developmental biology, cardiovascular physiology and virology. Extended field trips for which credit is offered also fall into this category.

    Prerequisites: appropriate 200-level biology courses.

  
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    BIO 351 - Physical Therapy Field Experience

    (2 credits)
    The experience acquaints the student more fully with the profession of physical therapy. Most professional schools of physical therapy require applicants to have had practical experience.

    Note: Graded on a pass/no pass basis.

    Prerequisites: sophomore class standing,physical therapy pre-professional, minimum cumulative GPA of 3.00.

  
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    BIO 352 - Veterinary Medicine Field Experience

    (2 credits)
    Under the overall supervision of the pre-veterinary advisory committee the student will spend time in clinic and on call observing the work of local veterinarians. An attempt will be made to expose the student to as many different veterinary specializations as possible.

    Note: Graded on a pass/no pass basis.

    Prerequisites: junior class standing, veterinary medicine pre-professional.

  
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    BIO 353 - Conservation of Natural Resources Field Experience

    (2 credits; non-yearly, consult department)
    The student would work under the supervision of persons involved in conservation work at the site of the cooperating agency.

    Note: Graded on a pass/no pass basis.

    Prerequisite: junior class standing and prior arrangement.

  
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    BIO 360 - Pathophysiology

    (4 credits)
    An introduction to the pathophysiology associated with the disease states of the human body. The focus of the course will be on distruptions in homeostasis as the result of organ system malfunction or failure. The pathophysiology associated with the following systems will be examined: blood, cells and cell growth, nervous, muscle, cardiovascular, endocrine, respiratory, renal, reproductive and gastrointestinal.

    Prerequisites: BIO122 or 222 and CHE102 or 112.

  
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    BIO 393 - Research Experience

    (1 credit)
    A research experience for biology ecological science majors in fulfillment of the department’s field skills requirement. The research experience course shall be designed to provide credit and documentation of a field experience. During enrollment in the research experience course, the student shall, under supervision of department faculty, analyze data collected during the field experience, organize and synthesize such data into a professional scientific paper, submit such a paper to an appropriate, peer-reviewed journal and make subsequent response to the journal pursuant to publication. Departmental approval required.

  
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    BIO 398 - Directed Study


  
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    BIO 417 - Internship

    (4 credits may apply toward the major)
  
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    BIO 425x - Biology/Chemistry Research Seminar

    (1/4 credit; non-yearly, consult department)
    A research seminar of in-progress studies in chemistry and biology by Northwestern students, faculty and selected invited guests from other institutions. Features presentation, discussion, analysis and critique of original research.

    Note: Course may be repeated. Graded on a pass/no pass basis. Student must attend 90% of the total number of seminars offered during the semester to receive a passing grade.

    Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

    Cross-Referenced: Cross-referenced in chemistry.
  
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    BIO 499 - Honors Research


  
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    BUS 101 - Introduction to Business

    (2 credits; alternate years, consult department)
    This course is an overview of the business and economics area with a special emphasis on the impact of business on society. It covers areas such as financing, real estate, law and economics, with particular emphasis on the social impact of these areas.

  
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    BUS 200 - Principles of Marketing

    (3 credits)
    This course introduces students to marketing terminology; defines the elements necessary in moving a product, service or idea from concept to market sales; and enables students to understand and replicate the marketing process at an entry level.

  
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    BUS 201 - Principles of Management

    (2 credits)
    This course introduces the student to the basic principles of management of people. It includes the understanding of peoples’ actions in the work place and the response to management and supervision. It includes the study of basic management tools and techniques.

  
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    BUS 218 - Business Ethics

    (2 credits)
    A study of basic ethical theories including the Christian impact on ethics. The applications of ethical decision-making to business problems and cases.

    Prerequisites: sophomore class standing and completion of at least two courses in business, economics or accounting.

  
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    BUS 300 - Principles of Finance

    (2 credits)
    This course covers the basic principles, theory and techniques of financial decision-making in the structure of a corporation.

    Prerequisites: ACC215 and 216 and MAT117.

  
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    BUS 304 - Investments

    (3 credits)
    Models of risk and return are carefully developed to provide a basis for assessing investment opportunities and to enhance our understanding of the role and importance of financial markets. A considerable portion of the course will be devoted to the pricing of derivative securities including options, forward contracts and futures contracts.

    Prerequisite: BUS300 or ACC315.

  
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    BUS 305 - Organizational Behavior and Theory

    (3 credits)
    This course will review the major historical and contemporary themes and phases of organizational theory and behavior. The class will examine and discuss the evolution and practice of the modern organization. The course will provide an understanding of the key concepts and principles of organization theory and behavior. This course will provide an opportunity for critical analysis and practical application of the concepts identified through the readings and lecture.

    Prerequisite: BUS201.

  
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    BUS 308 - Methods of Teaching Secondary Business

    (2 credits; alternate years, consult department)
    This course is the study of the content, techniques, materials and theory for teaching business at the secondary level.

    Note: The course does not count toward a major or minor in business education, business administration, accounting or economics.

  
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    BUS 309 - Human Resource Management

    (3 credits)
    Students study the development of human resources management, including history, policies,practices and applications. Specific attention is paid to the study of the processes involving the management of human resources and its legal environment.

    Prerequisites: BUS201 and BUS305 or permission of instructor.

  
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    BUS 310 - Sales and Sales Management

    (2 credits; alternate years, consult department)
    This course covers sales concepts of prospecting and qualifying; planning the sales presentation and closing the sale. It also explores legal, ethical and social responsibilities for the sales professional. The course provides the sales management tools of sales support and managing the sales force.

    Prerequisite: BUS200.

  
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    BUS 321 - Business Law I

    (3 credits)
    This course is designed to acquaint students with the legal principles which, when followed, allow business transactions to run smoothly and with predictability. The topics include contracts, agency and property law, plus criminal law, torts, the Uniform Commercial Code, the litigation process and alternatives to litigation. Both business and non-business students can benefit from this basic course on Anglo-American law.

  
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    BUS 322 - Business Law II

    (3 credits)
    A continuation of Business Law I, this course looks at sales transactions in more detail. It also focuses on the legal differences between sole proprietorships,partnerships and the corporate business structure. In addition, students learn the significance of negotiable instruments, learn how to minimize risk in credit transactions, study federal regulations of business, and look at the bankruptcy code.

    Prerequisite: BUS321 or permission of instructor.

  
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    BUS 323 - Operations Management

    (3 credits)
    The course investigates the theory, scope and practice in industrial and service management, including scheduling, inventory control, logistics, forecasting and coordination. Strong emphasis is placed on practical and behavioral aspects of operations management.

    Prerequisite: BUS201.

  
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    BUS 398 - Directed Study


 

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