2008-09 Catalog 
    
    Oct 04, 2022  
2008-09 Catalog [Archived Catalog]

Courses


 
  
  •  

    BUS 400 - Christian Entrepreneurial Leadership Seminar

    (2 credits)
    This is an upper-level course focusing on student interaction with successful Christian leaders from a broad spectrum of professional fields. Each week, one scheduled speaker will both meet informally with the class and participate in a classroom seminar. Students will maintain a journal of their observations; readings from a variety of entrepreneurial and leadership sources will be required. The student will also be required to participate in the Spring Leadership Conference at NWC and attend off-site experiential activities in the local area.

    Prerequisite: junior class standing.

  
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    BUS 401 - Consumer Behavior

    (3 credits)
    this course explores the cultural, social, personal and psychological factors influencing buyer behavior; buying-decision processes and stages; and learning theory integrated with consumer beliefs and attitudes.

    Prerequisite: BUS200.

  
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    BUS 402 - Business Research

    (3 credits)
    In this course, students learn to identify research needs,select research techniques, design research projects, develop research instruments and understand descriptive statistics methods. The goal is to equip them for reading, interpreting and conducting business research.

    Prerequisites: BUS200 and MAT117.

  
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    BUS 403 - Business Strategy

    (3 credits)
    This capstone course is designed to assist students in assimilating and synthesizing the material covered throughout their studies. It focuses on an integrated approach to management decision-making using all of the functional areas of business.

    Prerequisite: completion of business core and senior class standing.

  
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    BUS 404 - Advanced Corporate Finance

    (4 credits)
    This course is a continuation of Principles of Finance. We will explore topics such as the cost of capital, capital structure and dividend policy, and analyze their significance in long-term financing decisions. We will also examine international aspects of corporate finance and the management of risk with derivative securities.

    Prerequisite: BUS300 or ACC315.

  
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    BUS 405 - Strategic Marketing

    (3 credits) Individualized courses and programs:
    This course focuses on marketing management application in the business world. Students explore strategic marketing, decision making, marketing applications and ethical considerations while developing marketing plans for real-world clients. Students maintain a journal of their observations and present a deliverable plan to their clients.

    Prerequisite: BUS200.

  
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    BUS 417 - Internship

    (2 credits may apply toward the major)
  
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    BUS 499 - Honors Research


  
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    CED 101 - Introduction to Christian Ministry

    (2 credits)
    An introduction to the nature and purpose of Christian ministry in the local church. The course introduces the student to critical aspects of ministry such as the educational ministry of the church, discipleship and evangelism, and ministry to different age groups. The purpose of the course is to prepare the students for the Christian education and ministry major and the youth studies and adolescent studies minor. Students interested in the Christian education and ministry major should enroll in this course their first semester.

  
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    CED 210 - Foundational Issues in Christian Education

    (4 credits)
    The student is introduced to the philosophical, theological, biblical and historical foundations for ministry across the age span in the local church. Current theories concerning the practice of Christian education and ministry are also explored. The course is designed to prepare the student to formulate his/her own philosophy of ministry.

    Prerequisites: CED101 and REL110.

  
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    CED 214 - Introduction to Adolescent Culture and Ministry

    (2 credits)
    This course will introduce students to the concepts and issues pertinent to the study of the world of adolescence and ministry to adolescents. The course will seek to deepen and broaden current understandings of “youth ministry” by beginning to develop a student’s philosophical, biblical and theological basis for work with the next generation of the church.

  
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    CED 310 - Leadership Development

    (2 credits; alternate years, consult department)
    The course focuses on developing a leadership style that facilitates personal and community spiritual formation and also preparing others for ministry. An emphasis will be given to servant leadership and small group ministry.

    Prerequisites: CED101 and REL110.

  
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    CED 315 - Philosophy of Adolescent Ministry

    (4 credits; alternate years, consult department)
    An investigation and formulation of a philosophy of ministry to and with adolescents. Various theoretical issues will be examined which will inform and assist students in the development of a philosophy which is biblically grounded, developmentally sensitive, culturally relevant, and theologically contextualized to the world of contemporary adolescence.

    Prerequisites: CED214, and junior or senior class standing.

  
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    CED 320 - Teaching and Learning Strategies

    (4 credits; alternate years, consult department)
    The purpose of this course is to train students to teach Bible effectively in small group settings. The student is exposed to both the theory and practice of teaching and learning theories. Half the class is devoted to practicum in teaching.

    Prerequisite: CED210.

  
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    CED 380 - Narrative and Spiritual Formation

    (2 credits; alternate years, consult department)
    A study of narrative, both personal and biblical, with the intent of understanding the power and potential of narrative for both learning and spiritual formation across the age span. The course will include both theory of narrative and practical elements of story telling.

    Prerequisite: CED210.

  
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    CED 398 - Directed Study


  
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    CED 401 - Integrated Field Experience I


  
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    CED 402 - Integrated Field Experience II

    (2 credits each)
    Practical involvement in Christian education/youth ministry in a local church or para-church organization, for two consecutive semesters for Christian education majors and one semester for youth ministry and adolescent studies minors, is the primary focus of these two courses. The experience must be under supervision of an on-site supervisor and the professor of Christian education. The student is exposed to various aspects of ministry at the discretion of the on-site supervisor. Students also meet on campus for weekly seminars related to the student’s ministry involvement.

    Prerequisites: senior class standing and permission of instructor.

  
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    CED 417 - Internship

    (2 credits may apply toward the major)
  
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    CED 450 - Special Topics

    (2 credits)
    An opportunity to focus on different issues of ministry not covered in other courses. The course will provide opportunity for in-depth study of particular topics related to the Christian ministry.

  
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    CED 499 - Honors Research


  
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    CHE 101 - College Chemistry

    (4 credits)
    General Education Requirement / Option: (general education option under natural science)

    An introductory course in inorganic chemistry. The treatment of topics is predominantly descriptive and the content is especially suited to meet the needs of students whose programs require only one year of chemistry.

    Note: Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory period per week. Open to all students.

  
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    CHE 102 - College Chemistry

    (4 credits)
    An introductory course in organic and biological chemistry. The content is especially suited to meet the needs of students whose programs require only one year of chemistry.

    Note: Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory period per week.

    Prerequisite: CHE101.

  
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    CHE 105 - Topics in Chemistry

    (4 credits)
    General Education Requirement / Option: (general education option under natural science)

    This course offers an introductory level chemical exploration of interdisciplinary scientific, cultural, or theological topics. Possible topics include energy and environment, forensic chemistry, chemistry and art, nanotechnology, and medicinal chemistry.

  
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    CHE 111 - General Chemistry

    (4 credits)
    General Education Requirement / Option: (general education option under natural science)

    An introductory course in chemistry that emphasizes physical and inorganic concepts, problems and calculations. Topics include chemical reactions, stoichiometry, properties of gases, thermochemistry, theories of atomic structure, and chemical bonding. The general chemistry sequence (Chemistry 111 and Chemistry 112) is recommended for students with good math / science preparations who intend to proceed to advanced courses in chemistry, the biological sciences or engineering.

    Note: Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory period per week.

    Prerequisites: high school chemistry and ACT math and natural science scores above the 74th percentile.

  
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    CHE 112 - General Chemistry

    (4 credits)
    A continuation of Chemistry 111. Topics covered include kinetics, thermodynamics, chemical equilibria, acid-base chemistry and nuclear chemistry.

    Note: Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory period per week.

    Prerequisite: CHE111 or consent of the instructor.

  
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    CHE 211 - Quantitative Analysis

    (4 credits; alternate years, consult department)
    The theory and practice of volumetric and gravimetric analysis, including the use of oxidation-reduction reactions and spectrophotometry.

    Note: Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory period per week.

    Prerequisite: CHE112 or CHE102 and permission of instructor.

  
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    CHE 315 - Instrumental Analysis

    (4 credits; alternate years, consult department)
    A study of the theory and operation of common laboratory instruments. Topics include: infrared, visible and ultraviolet spectroscopy; atomic absorption and emission spectroscopy; nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy; mass spectrometry; gas and liquid chromatography; electrochemical methods.

    Note: Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory period per week.

    Prerequisite: CHE211.

  
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    CHE 321 - Organic Chemistry

    (4 credits)
    The study of carbon compounds and their functional groups, including nomenclature, synthesis, reactions, structures, mechanisms and spectroscopic analysis.

    Note: Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory period per week.

    Prerequisites: CHE102 or 112 or permission of instructor.

  
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    CHE 322 - Organic Chemistry

    (4 credits)
    A continuation of the study of carbon compounds and their functional groups, including nomenclature, synthesis, reactions, structures, mechanisms and spectroscopic analysis.

    Note: Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory period per week.

    Prerequisite: CHE321.

  
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    CHE 326x - Biochemistry: Proteins and Metabolism

    (4 credits; alternate years, consult department)
    A fundamental course surveying biomolecuA fundamental course surveying biomolecules, catabolism, bioenergetics and biosynthesis.les, catabolism, bioenergetics and biosynthesis.

    Note: Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory period per week.

    Prerequisites: CHE321 and 322.

    Cross-Referenced: Cross-referenced in biology.
  
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    CHE 398 - Directed Study


  
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    CHE 411 - Advanced Inorganic Chemistry

    (3 credits; alternate years, consult department)
    A study of the chemistry of metals and nonmetals with an emphasis on periodicity, chemical bonding, structure and reaction mechanisms.

    Prerequisite:CHE322.

  
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    CHE 417 - Internship

    (4 credits may apply toward the major)
  
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    CHE 425x - Biology/Chemistry Research Seminar

    (1/4 credit; non-yearly, consult department)
    A weekly research seminar of in- progress studies in chemistry and biology by Northwestern students, faculty and selected invited guests from other institutions. Featuchemistry: Proteins and Metabolism A fundamental course surveying biomolecres presentation, discussion, analysis and critique of original research.

    Note: Course may be repeated. Graded on a pass/no pass basis. Student must attend 90% of the total number of seminars offered during the semester to receive a passing grade.

    Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

  
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    CHE 433x - Introductory Physical Chemistry

    (4 credits; alternate years, consult department)
    An introductory course in chemical thermodynamics, quantum chemistry and chemical kinetics.

    Note: Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory period per week.

    Prerequisites: MAT112 and 211; and either chemistry: Proteins and Metabolism A fundamental course surveying biomolecCHE112 or PHY212.

    Cross-Referenced: Cross-referenced in physics.
  
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    CHE 436x - Intermediate Physical Chemistry

    (4 credits; alternate years, consult department)
    An intermediate course in chemical thermodynamics, quantum chemistry, and chemical kinetics.

    Note: Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory period per week.

    Prerequisite: CHE433x.

    Cross-Referenced: Cross-referenced in physics.
  
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    CHE 499 - Honors Research


  
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    COM 101x - Mass Media and Society

    (4 credits)
    Examines the historical development, organization and structure of the mass media in contemporary society, as well as related issues and problems. Suggests Christian perspectives on use of and participation in the mass media.

    Cross-Referenced: Cross-referenced in theatre/speech.
  
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    COM 164x - Photography I

    (2 credits)
    Taught as a medium of creative expression or as an art form and as a journalistic tool. Film processing and printing are taught as well as camera techniques, darkroom procedures, and presentation of work for exhibitions.

    Cross-Referenced: Cross-referenced in art.
  
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    COM 185 - Media Writing

    (4 credits)
    Students learn genres of writing for print and broadcast journalism and video, as well as for public relations and advertising. They learn these genres in relation to each other and in relation to their organizational contexts and audiences. Included are reporting, organizing and writing, as well as basic legal and ethical guidelines for reporters and writers in journalism and PR.

    Prerequisite or co-requisite: the college writing requirement.

  
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    COM 202 - Video Production

    (3 credits)
    Acquaints the student with the basic equipment, techniques, and procedures of video production, both in studio and on location. Attention to principles of videotape editing.

  
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    COM 210 - Topics in Communications

    (2-4 credits; alternate years, consult department)
    An exploration of an area or genre of communication not adequately covered in the current curriculum. See the professor listed for details about the current topic.

  
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    COM 215 - Practicum in Public Relations

    (1 credit)
    Practical experience in public relations related projects such as publicity, promotions, employee and customer relations, special events, advertising, Web design, corporate research, grant writing, and human resources development and training. Project sites and sponsors may be campus departments and organizations, community businesses, and non-profit organizations.

    Note: Course may be repeated.

    Prerequisites: completion of, or enrollment in, any of the following courses: COM230, 261, 263, 315, 332, 355, and ENG288, or permission of instructor.

  
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    COM 217 - Communication Practicum in Print Media

    (1 credit)
    Practical experience working on the campus newspaper, the Beacon, or the college yearbook, the Cornerstone.

    Note: Course may be repeated.

    Prerequisite: students must be accepted for membership on one of these publications before signing up for the practicum.

  
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    COM 219 - Communication Practicum in Television Production

    (1 credit)
    Practical experience working with television productions produced for TV-3, the campus cable TV channel.

    Note: Course may be repeated.

    Prerequisite: COM202, 206 or 255.

  
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    COM 230 - Principles of Public Relations

    (3 credits; alternate years, consult department)
    Introduction to the field of public relations. Its focus is on public relations theory and practice with an emphasis on emerging trends. This course is offered as an overview covering public relations history, theories, strategies and tactics.

  
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    COM 260 - News Writing and Editing

    (4 credits; alternate years, consult department)
    Principles of clear and forceful journalistic writing. Includes fact gathering, story planning, lead and head writing. Attention to editing for improved copy, headline writing, and selection of photographs and art work.

    Prerequisite: COM185 or permission of instructor.

  
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    COM 261 - Feature Writing

    (2 credits; alternate years, consult department)
    Study of interviewing practices, research methods, organization, and interest-gathering techniques necessary for writing longer articles, profiles, columns and consumer affairs writing.

    Prerequisite: COM185 or permission of instructor.

  
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    COM 263 - Layout and Design

    (3 credits)
    Covers basic principles of design as they apply to a wide variety of publications. Emphasis on selecting type, art and graphics appropriate to subject matter, purpose and audience.

  
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    COM 265x - Photography II

    (2 credits; alternate years, consult department)
    The fundamentals of photography as an art medium and a journalistic tool are used to develop an individual style or method of composing and printing photographs. This individual aesthetic approach will be seen in all the work presented at the end of the course.

    Prerequisite: COM164x.

    Cross-Referenced: Cross-referenced in art.
  
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    COM 270 - Screenwriting: Short Film

    (4 credits)
    Through writing short film scripts, students learn the basic elements of effective story structure. Students also gain an understanding of the craft and vocation of screen writing.

  
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    COM 300 - Digital Video Editing

    (3 credits; alternate years, consult department)
    A study of the basic principles and aesthetics of editing film, video and digital media, with practical experience in short editing projects.

    Prerequisite: COM202 or permission of instructor.

  
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    COM 302 - Advanced Video Production

    (3 credits; alternate years, consult department)
    This course is designed to advance a student’s conceptual foundation and skills in the area of video production. It includes sections addressing writing for the media, electronic field production, advanced studio techniques, nonlinear editing, digital video effects, and multimedia production. Special attention is given to the application of aesthetic principles to the video production process.

    Prerequisite: COM202 or permission of instructor.

  
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    COM 310 - Advanced Topics in Communications

    (2-4 credits; alternate years, consult department)
    This course is designed to be an upper- level course providing in-depth and additional knowledge and/or skill in specific discipline areas that are not well covered in the current curriculum. Topics will vary according to students’ interests and needs, changes and developments in the communication discipline and practice, and faculty skills and interest. Potential topics may include additional instruction in advertising, public relations, magazine writing, advanced news writing and editing, advanced video editing, digital video directing, and international and intercultural communication.

    Prerequisites: to be determined by department.

  
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    COM 315 - Writing and Design for the Web

    (3 credits; alternate years, consult department)
    Study of writing and design for a Web environment. Students will analyze Internet sites and design sites of their own, using a standard program for Web design.

    Prerequisites: ENG184 or equivalent and any of the following: COM263, ART220, ART230, or permission of instructor.

  
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    COM 325 - American Cinema Studies

    (4credits; alternate years, consult department)
    This overview of the history of cinema examines some of its representative genres and their development. Topics include the film industry, methods of film distribution, film technique, and the impact of film on a society.

  
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    COM 328 - Media Law

    (3 credits; alternate years, consult department)
    Students understand and learn to apply the legal foundation for media practice both laws that set limits on their practice and laws that authorize and protect their work as media practitioners. The course reviews the laws, court rulings and ethical codes governing freedom of expression, libel, intellectual property, invasion of privacy, hate speech, symbolic speech, obscenity, pornography, and professional conflict of interest. Students will complete a significant research project exploring the legal context of their expected area of practice within the media-journalism, advertising, PR, or multimedia.

    Prerequisite: COM185 Media Writing or permission of instructor

  
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    COM 332 - Social Foundations of Advertising

    (3 credits; alternate years, consult department)
    An introduction to social and historical foundations of advertising. Includes a study of the role of advertising in American culture and economy.

  
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    COM 350 - Corporate Video Production

    (3 credits; alternate years, consult department)
    This course examines all aspects of this field, from concept development to the final stages of post production. The roles of the writer, producer, director and client will be examined, while focusing on the dynamics among these key players. We will cover all the technical and creative elements used in the creation of media in the corporate world.

    Prerequisite: COM202 or permission of instructor.

  
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    COM 355 - Organizational Communication

    (4 credits; alternate years)
    Examination of the role of communication within and between organizations. Attention to communication tasks within an organization such as news releases, memo writing, conducting meetings, and communicating to an organization’s constituencies.

  
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    COM 360 - Film Aesthetics and Criticism

    (4 credits; alternate years, consult department)
    General Education Requirement / Option: (general education option under fine arts)

    This course is an examination of film as one of the dominant art forms and influencer’s of our culture. We will look at film form, genres and content, and we will do film critique.

  
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    COM 365x - Acting for the Camera

    (3 credits; alternate years, consult department)
    Study and practice of acting skills and techniques in front of cameras using scenes from television, film, commercials and industrial scripts. Course also includes sections on audition techniques and the business of acting.

    Prerequisite: THE215, COM202 or permission of instructor.

    Cross-Referenced: Cross-referenced in theatre/ speech.
  
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    COM 398 - Directed Study


  
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    COM 400 - Community Journalism

    (3 credits; alternate years, consult department)
    Theory and practice of writing and reporting for, as well as leading, community newspapers–weeklies and smaller dailies. Topics include investigating local government, reporting on meetings, reporting on religion, developing local sources of information,understanding the roles of the newspaper within the community, forming relationships of trust with sources and readers, and dealing with common ethical issues.

  
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    COM 417 - Internship

    (4 credits may apply toward the major)
    Experience in an approved internship.

  
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    COM 499 - Honors Research


  
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    CSC 100 - Computing Topics

    (1 credit)
    This course covers specific uses for computers and technology in a variety of tasks, such as spreadsheet or Internet use. Each section of the course exposes students to a different topic. Different sections may be required by different disciplines.

    Note: Different sections may be taken for credit, but individual sections may not be repeated for credit.

  
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    CSC 102 - Business Computing

    (2 credits)
    This course serves as an introduction to common business- oriented computer technologies and issues. Computer applications, misuse and the ethical use of computers in business are explored in detail. Current software applications are studied through laboratories, demonstrations and assignments. Students will learn advanced uses of application programs including spreadsheet processing and information processing with databases.

  
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    CSC 151 - Office Application Programming

    (2 credits)
    This course focuses on the customization and programmability of commonly used business applications. The main topics covered will include writing macros, controlling spreadsheets, databases and other business applications using scripts and short programs, and customizing applications to fit specific business needs.

    Prerequisite: CSC102 or permission of instructor.

  
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    CSC 171 - Computer Science I

    (4 credits)
    General Education Requirement / Option: (general education option under mathematics)

    This is the first in a two-semester sequence of courses that introduces students to fundamental aspects of the field of computing; focusing on problem-solving, software design concepts and their realization as computer programs. Topics include procedural abstraction, control structures, iteration, data types and their representation. An introduction to a high-level language, for the purpose of gaining mastery of these principles, will be provided in lectures and hands-on laboratory experiences.

    Prerequisite: C- or better in MAT090, an ACT math score of 20 or above (SAT 480 or above), or a passing score on the MAT090 placemechemistry: Proteins and Metabolism A fundamental course surveying biomolecnt exam.

  
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    CSC 172 - Computer Science II

    (4 credits)
    This course moves students into the domain of software design, introducing principles that are necessary for solving large problems. Here, the classical software design process serves as a basis for treating such topics as abstract data types, specifications, complexity analysis and file organization. Basic data structures and transformations are introduced as representative of the fundamental tools that are used to aid in this process. A high-level language will be used for the purpose of gaining mastery of these principleschemistry: Proteins and Metabolism A fundamental course surveying biomolec through lectures and independent hands-on laboratory experiences.

    Prerequisite: CSC171.

  
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    CSC 200 - Principles of Computer Information Systems

    (2 credits; alternate years, consult department)
    This course outlines the concepts of computer information systems, data as a resource, information technology planning and implementation, and project management. Topics covered include decision theory, information theory, the role of information technology in an organization, evaluation of system performance, the development process, and societal and ethical issues related to information systems design and use.

  
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    CSC 270 - Computer Organization

    (4 credits; alternate years, consult department)
    This course explores architecture and computer design issues in modern computers. Part of the course is spent looking at the basic building blocks used to design and build a computer. The rest of the course deals with how to work with the computer at the level of the central processing unit, main memory and registers. Programming assignments are done in assembly language to see what commands the computer really understands.

    Corequisite: CSC172.

  
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    CSC 280 - Computer Systems Management

    (2 credits; alternate years, consult department)
    Provides a practical introduction to the management and administration of a computer system. This course covers what it takes to keep a computer system going and how to ensure that users can and do use the computer efficiently. Topics covered include managing users, managing networks, hardware, operating systems and software management, developing administration policy, ethics and various related topics. The Unix operating system is used to provide practical demonstration of the topics covered. A version of Unix that can operate on a 386 or better machine will be provided.

    Prerequisites: CSC171, 172,and 270.

  
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    CSC 291 - Database Management Systems

    (4 credits; alternate years, consult department)
    This course examines database concepts, theory, design and management. Emphasis will be on the relational model. Topics will also include normalization, query languages, database recovery and security aspects. This course will include experience with a relational database system and programming database access into computer applications via a high-level programming language.

    Prerequisite: CSC171.

  
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    CSC 300 - Electronic Commerce Development

    (4 credits; alternate years, consult department)
    This course provides an introduction to electronic commerce strategy and the development and architecture of electronic business solutions and their components. Topics covered include the business models and economics associated with e-commerce, system design and implementation, building a Web interface for e- commerce, reliability, security concerns, and legal and ethical issues.

    Prerequisite: CSC172.

  
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    CSC 321 - Human-Computer Interaction

    (4 credits; alternate years, consult department)
    Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) focuses on how a user interacts with and interprets the interface of a program. A good interface can make an average program seem better than it is, and a poor interface can ruin a technically superior piece of software. This course will include theory and case studies in lecture and practical programming exercises in lab. A final project will combine theory with programming by designing, implementing, testing and evaluating a complete interface to an application.

    Prerequisite: CSC172.

  
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    CSC 351 - Data Structures

    (4 credits; alternate years, consult department)
    This course deals with data structures and their algorithms. Emphasis is given to good data abstraction and efficiency. The data structures covered include arrays, linked lists, trees, graphs and strings. Other topics covered may include design patterns, analysis of algorithms, and complexity classes. Programming is done in an object-oriented language.

    Prerequisite: CSC172.

  
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    CSC 361 - Networking

    (4 credits; alternate years, consult department)
    This course introduces the student to the field of computer networking. Students will develop an understanding of the general principles of computer communication as they are worked out in an appropriate protocol suite. Specific attention will be paid to principles of architecture, layering, multiplexing, addressing and address mapping, routing and naming. Problems considered include the writing of network software, the physical construction of networks, the Internet and its future development, and network security.

    Prerequisite: CSC172.

  
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    CSC 371 - Operating Systems

    (4 credits; alternate years, consult department)
    Introduction to hardware and software related to system organization. Such topics as process management, device management, and memory management are discussed, as are relevant issues associated with security and protection.

    Prerequisite: CSC270.

  
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    CSC 381 - Programming Languages

    (4 credits; alternate years, consult department)
    This course discusses programming languages from a general viewpoint-what are the properties of all successful programming languages? Also discussed are various programming paradigms: iterative programming, object-oriented programming, functional programming, logic programming, concurrent programming, etc. Programming may be done all in one language (emulate other paradigms), in a few select languages (one for each paradigm), or in a large variety of languages.

    Prerequisites: CSC270 and 351.

  
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    CSC 398 - Directed Study


  
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    CSC 417 - Internship

    (2 credits may apply toward the major)
  
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    CSC 420 - Special Topics

    (3 or 4 credits; alternate years, consult department)
    This course is for upper-level computer science majors to cover current topics in computer science. Possible topics for this course include computer graphics, compiler construction, parallel processing, high-performance computing, and artificial intelligence.

    Prerequisite: junior or senior class standing or permission of instructor.

  
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    CSC 450 - Value Issues in Computing

    (2 credits)
    This course focuses on a range of social and ethical issues involved in computer science and computer use. Computer professionals have to face these issues and deal with them in a responsible way. Some issues discussed in the course include ethical decision making, software piracy, software protection, computer crime, privacy, errors and reliability, computers and the workplace, responsibility and reliability, artificial intelligence, and virtual reality.

  
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    CSC 470 - Senior Project

    (2 credits)
    This course gives the student an opportunity to branch off into an area of their own selection. The student must obtain approval of a project proposal from a member of the department before registering for this course. The project will require planning, design, and implementation of a computer application in such a way as to integrate the material from computer science courses and courses outside computer science. Students with career concentrations or minors are encouraged to make use of materials from their other subject areas.

  
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    CSC 499 - Honors Research


  
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    ECO 101 - Survey of Economics

    (4 credits)
    General Education Requirement / Option: (general education option under social science)

    This is an introductory course in economics which will cover both microeconomics and macroeconomics topics. The course will explore economic institutions, how they came to be, how they have changed over time, and how the government modifies them.

    Note: The course is not open to business or economics majors.

  
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    ECO 213 - Principles of Microeconomics

    (4 credits)
    Microeconomics deals with price determination and how the price system functions. Supply and demand, output,competition, monopoly,resource pricing, international trade and finance will be studied.

  
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    ECO 214 - Principles of Macroeconomics

    (3 credits)
    Macroeconomics views the big picture in economics. It concerns itself with aggregates and the impact on cities, states and nations. The problems of inflation, unemployment, pollution, recessions, the national debt and international trade will be studied. Current applications of monetary and fiscal policy will also be surveyed.

    Prerequisite: ECO213.

  
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    ECO 301 - Money and Banking

    (3 credits)
    This course is designed to increase understanding of how banks and the banking system fit into the whole economic picture. The functions of money, federal reserve system, monetary theory, inflation and international finance are several units of study.

    Prerequisites: ECO213 and 214.

  
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    ECO 302 - Labor Economics

    (3 credits)
    Labor problems have existed since the first person was hired to work for another. Salaries, minimum wage, job security, fringe benefits, unions, negotiations and the extent of government involvement in each, will lay the groundwork for this course. Special emphasis is placed on current practice and theory in labor-management negotiations.

    Prerequisites: ECO213 and 214.

  
  •  

    ECO 305 - Current Economic Problems

    (3 credits; alternate years, consult department)
    This is an upper-level discussion course designed to require students to apply economic principles and policies to issues confronting economists in business and government. Both micro and macro concepts are explored. Certain controversial issues to be confronted deal with the extent of government involvement in the economy, energy, employment, inflation, deficits and world trade.

    Prerequisites: ECO213 and 214.

  
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    ECO 314 - Intermediate Macroeconomics

    (4 credits; alternate years, consult department)
    Builds on the concepts of inflation, unemployment and economic growth learned in principles level macroeconomics. Introduces models with which the student will become more proficient in understanding how the economy works.

    Prerequisite: ECO214 and MAT111 or 112.

  
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    ECO 315 - Intermediate Microeconomics

    (4 credits; alternate years, consult department)
    This course will examine economic theory and methodology with emphasis on the principles of price determination, consumer behavior, market equilibrium, optimality of resource allocation, production and costs, comparison of market structures, and the behavior of firms in nonperfect competition.

    Prerequisite: ECO213 and MAT111 or 112.

  
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    ECO 333 - International Economics

    (3 credits)
    A study of the theory and practice of international trade, international economic and monetary activities, balance of trade, international payment mechanisms, exchange rate systems, functions of the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank, and the effects of debtor nations on domestic economic policies.

    Prerequisites: ECO213 and 214.

  
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    ECO 390 - Game Theory

    (3 credits; alternate years, consult department)
    This course is an introduction to and survey of the theory of games (multiperson decision theory) and its applications, primarily in economics. The Nash equilibrium concept will be carefully developed to provide a basis for analyzing various forms of strategic interaction. Areas of application will include oligopolistic markets, common resource markets, stock market microstructure and corporate takeovers. In addition to economic applications, we will use game theory to explore selected political, social and religious issues.

    Prerequisites: MAT111 or 112, or permission of instructor.

  
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    ECO 398 - Directed Study


  
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    ECO 417 - Internship

    (4 credits may apply toward the major)
 

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