2008-09 Catalog 
    
    Oct 04, 2022  
2008-09 Catalog [Archived Catalog]

Courses


 
  
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    ECO 499 - Honors Research


  
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    EDU 102 - Foundations of Education

    (2 credits)
    This course provides philosophical, historical, social and economical foundational background for students considering the teaching profession.

    Note: This course includes a field experience.

  
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    EDU 202 - Early Field Experience

    (1 credit)
    This course requires 25 clock-hours of field experience with a certified teacher in an area school.

    Note: Graded on a pass/no pass basis.

    Prerequisite: EDU102.

  
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    EDU 206 - Survey of Exceptional Individuals

    (3 credits)
    This course focuses on the Teaching of Foundations portion of the Teacher as a Servant Model. It provides an overview of the history of special education up to and including present day trends and practices in education students with exceptionalities. Various areas of exceptionality are explored, including ways to support students with diverse learning and behavioral needs in inclusionary environments.

    Note: This course includes10 hours of field experience.

  
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    EDU 221 - Growth and Development of the Middle School Aged Student

    (3 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    The middle school growth and development primarily embraces the knowledge of the learner component of the professional knowledge base with concentration, identification and comprehension of the physical, psychosocial, and cognitive characteristics of the middle school aged student.

  
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    EDU 227 - Instructional Technology

    (1 credit)
    This course studies the impact and uses of media and technology in educational settings. Use and operation of AV equipment will be taught. Emphasis is placed on the various ways the computer can be used in teaching. Current and future use of technology in education will be addressed.

  
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    EDU 228 - Children’s Literature

    (2 credits)
    This course primarily focuses on the knowledge of teaching component of the “Teacher as Servant” model. The course also focuses on the knowledge of foundations, by studying the history of children’s literature and its uses in the classroom. This course provides an introduction to the criteria and selection of Children’s literature for elementary school students. Various genres are detailed, and ideas for curriculum integration are discussed. A study of illustrations and authors is included.

    Note: This course includes 5 hours of field experience.

  
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    EDU 229 - Introduction to Early Childhood

    (3 credits)
    This course provides an overview of the field of early childhood education. Included in its overview will be the study of the historical background and current trends, child development-birth to eight years, philosophies of early childhood education teaching, and issues in early childhood education. Early childhood curriculum design in the areas of language arts, math, science, social studies and the creative arts is incorporated in this course.

    Note: While this course includes 25 hours of field experience, the entire early childhood endorsement includes 100 hours of field experience.

  
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    EDU 230 - Organization and Administration of Early Childhood Programs

    (3 credits)
    This course presents the knowledge of child-family-school-community relationships including familiarity with various community agencies providing services for preschool children. Research for helping develop a good early childhood program will be incorporated. Also included will be licensing procedures, physical environment, personnel and curriculum development, funding, and evaluation. Careers available in the early childhood field will be explored.

    Note: While this course includes 25 hours of field experience, the entire early childhood endorsement includes 100 hours of field experience.

    Prerequisite: EDU229 or permission of instructor.

  
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    EDU 235 - Characteristics of Learners with Mild and Moderate Disabilities

    (3 credits)
    An overview of mild/moderate disabilities including historical and theoretical perspectives. Designed for students seeking reading, unified early childhood and special education endorsements.

    Prerequisite: EDU206.

  
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    EDU 300 - Characteristics of Young Children with Diverse Needs

    (3 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    The purpose of this course is to assist the pre-service teacher in acquiring information and developing skills in regard to working with the young child (ages 0-8) who has special needs. This course will examine normal and atypical patterns and sequences of development in infants and toddlers in the cognitive, language, motor, social, emotional, behavioral and sensory domains. Normal and atypical etiology will be examined. Developmental delays will be examined through various assessment methods. Early identification techniques, interventions and service delivery models will be examined. The medically fragile child as well as the child with multiple disabilities will be discussed in regard to assessment, interventions and service delivery models.

    Note: This course includes 25 hours of field experience.

    Prerequisites: EDU102 and 206.

  
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    EDU 301 - Methods for Working with Young Children with Diverse Needs

    (3 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    The purpose of this course is to assist the pre-service teacher in developing methods for working with young children with special needs. This course will ask students to demonstrate mastery of the applied competencies in the unified early childhood program, focusing on interdisciplinary, inclusionary, and family centered practices.

    Note: This course includes 25 hours of field experience.

  
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    EDU 304 - Educational Psychology

    (2 credits)
    The application of psychological principles to the learner, the learning process and the learning situation.

    Prerequisites: EDU102, PSY221 or 224, and junior class standing.

  
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    EDU 308 - Special Methods in Major

    (2 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    A study of the content, techniques, and materials in the student’s major field needed to qualify for secondary teacher certification. Biology, chemistry and natural science majors see course offering under NSC308. Economics, history, political science, social science and sociology majors see course offering under SSC308. Kinesiology majors see course offering under KIN318. All other majors see course offering, number 308, under your major department.

  
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    EDU 309 - Transition for Students with Mild to Moderate Disabilities

    (2 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    A study of the job opportunities and training for the adolescent mentally disabled student.

    Prerequisites: EDU206 and 235.

  
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    EDU 311 - General Methods in Secondary Education

    (3 credits)
    The principles and methods of teaching at the secondary level, including lesson plans, teaching skills, reading in the content area, classroom management, evaluation and school law.

    Note: This course includes field experience.

    Prerequisite: sophomore class standing and admission to the teacher education program.

  
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    EDU 312 - Middle School Methods and Curriculum

    (3 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    This course embraces the knowledge of the teaching component of the professional knowledge base with concentration on the philosophy of the middle school, organization of the curriculum, effective teaching strategies, and assessment.

    Prerequisite: junior class standing.

  
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    EDU 314 - Working with Parents

    (2 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    This course is designed to investigate approaching trends and issues pertinent in developing professional relationships between the special education staff and other individuals associated with the special needs learner.

    Prerequisite: EDU206.

  
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    EDU 315 - Behavior Management and Classroom Instruction

    (3 credits)
    This course is designed to provide an overview of various models for classroom and behavior management. The course will emphasize both theoretical and practical dimensions of behavior and social concerns.

    Note: This course includes a 10 hour field experience.

    Prerequisite: EDU206.

  
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    EDU 318 - Diagnostic Assessment, Teaching and Evaluation of Special Education Students

    (3 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    A study in the purposes, procedures and issues related to screening, testing and evaluation of special needs students. The course will include a study of diagnostic instruments used by the profession.

    Prerequisite: EDU206.

  
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    EDU 319 - Communication and Collaborative Partnerships for Special Educators

    (2 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    This course provides strategies for working with regular classroom teachers, support services, personnel, paraprofessionals and other individuals involved in the educational program.

    Prerequisite: EDU206.

  
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    EDU 323 - Teaching Mathematics

    (3 credits)
    This course is designed to address the knowledge of teaching area of Northwestern College’s Teacher as Servant Model. A study of materials, lesson design, methods, and procedures for the teaching of mathematics at the elementary and middle school levels are the primary points of study for this course.

    Note: A ten hour practicum experience is a key component of this course.

    Prerequisite: admission to the teacher education program.

  
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    EDU 325 - Teaching Science and Social Studies

    (3 credits)
    Foundational course for teaching science and social studies in the elementary classroom. Methods and materials will be developed as they relate to modern practices of teaching science and social studies. This course will focus on the broad range of topics covered in this curricular area.

    Note: This course includes field experience.

    Prerequisite: admission into teacher education program.

  
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    EDU 326 - Teaching Reading and Language Arts

    (3 credits)
    This course primarily focuses on the knowledge of teaching component of the “Teacher as Servant” model with a significant emphasis on the role of the teacher and instructional methodology. Lesson design and methods for the teaching of language arts are the primary points of study for this course. Specifically, this course addresses how to teach reading, writing, spelling, handwriting, and grammar.

    Note: This course includes 10 hours of field experience.

  
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    EDU 327 - Classroom Management for Secondary Teachers

    (1 credit)
    The objective of this course is to teach students effective strategies for organizing and managing an effective classroom. Included in this course are guidelines for organizing your classroom and materials, choosing rules and procedures, maintaining appropriate student behaviors, managing student work and planning and conducting instruction. Students will interview classroom teachers to discover management strategies that have worked effectively for them.

  
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    EDU 336 - Methods and Strategies for Learners with Mild and Moderate Disabilities (K-6)

    (3 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    This course is designed to prepare pre-service teachers to develop and implement intervention strategies as well as appropriate accommodations and modifications to address students’ exceptional learning and behavioral needs at the elementary school level. Pre-service teachers will also develop/refine skills in IEP writing, incorporating assessment and evaluation information as well as input from parents/families.

    Note: This course includes a 10 hour field experience.

    Prerequisites: EDU206 and 235.

  
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    EDU 337 - Methods of Working with Students with Mild/Moderate Disabilities at the Secondary Level

    (3 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    This course prepares college students to teach students with exceptional learning needs at the secondary level. A practicum experience of ten hours is required.

    Note: This course includes field experience.

    Prerequisites: EDU206 and 235.

  
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    EDU 340 - Human Relations

    (3 credits)
    The primary focus of this course is “Teacher as Servant”. Major issues and concepts associated with living in a culturally diverse society and teaching in culturally diverse schools will be clarified. Students will consider ways in which ethnicity, gender/sexuality, social class, and religion intersect and influence beliefs and behaviors.

    Note: A 20 hour experience, both in schools and outside of schools in diverse settings is a key component of this course.

  
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    EDU 343 - Diagnosis and Correction of Reading Problems

    (3 credits)
    Diagnosis and Correction of Reading Problems focuses both on the “knowledge of teaching” and the “knowledge of learning” components of Northwestern College’s “Teacher as Servant” Model, with a significant emphasis on the role of the assessment and remediation of reading problems. Students will study the design, development, implementation and evaluation of remediation for students with reading problems, including diagnostic and prescriptive procedures for individuals and groups of students. Formal and informal assessment procedures will be examined.

    Note: A 10 hour practicum experience is a key component of this course.

    Prerequisite: EDU326 and admission into teacher education program.

  
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    EDU 345 - Language Learning and Reading Disabilities

    (3 credits)
    This course focuses on learning oral language and the implications that has for learning written language. A major part of the course is devoted to designing effective remedial education programs for Title I and special education. Special attention is paid to early intervention programs. This is an upper level course, designed for students completing reading and special education endorsements.

    Note: This course includes field experience.

    Prerequisites: EDU326 and 343.

  
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    EDU 347 - Reading in the Content Area

    (3 credits)
    This course addresses skills necessary in teaching students to read in social studies, math, science, and other content areas. This course offers strategies for vocabulary, comprehension, study skills, writing, assessment, and more.

    Note: This course includes 5 hours of field experience.

    Prerequisite: EDU326.

  
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    EDU 398 - Directed Study


  
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    EDU 406 - Student Teaching in Reading

    (4 credits)
    A supervised experience in an elementary or secondary classroom under a certified reading teacher.

    Note: Graded on a pass/no pass basis.

  
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    EDU 407 - Early Childhood Student Teaching

    (4 credits)
    Observation, participation and teaching students in both pre- kindergarten and kindergarten settings.

    Note: Graded on a pass/no pass basis.

    Prerequisites: EDU229 and 230, and KIN104 or current first aid and infant child CPR certification.

  
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    EDU 408 - Paraprofessional Practicum

    (4-16 credits)
    A 4-16 week classroom experience in an elementary classroom under a certified teacher. The satisfactory completion of this experience will allow the student to complete the elementary major but the student will not be recommended for teacher licensure.

    Note: Graded on a pass/no pass basis.

  
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    EDU 409 - Philosophy of Education

    (3 credits)
    The liberally educated Christian teacher is the knowledgeable servant of God and society and this course examines critically the reasoning behind policies and methods of teaching, learning and schooling. Various schools of thought are discussed, including a distinctively Christian perspective, to assist students in their personal response to these issues as they serve as professional teachers.

    Prerequisite: admission into teacher education program.

  
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    EDU 410 - TESL Student Teaching

    (4 credits)
    A four-week K-12 classroom experience in observation, participation and teaching students who have English as a second language.

    Note: Graded on a pass/no pass basis.

  
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    EDU 411 - Student Teaching in the Middle School

    (4-8 credits)
    A 4- to 8-week classroom experience of observation, participation and teaching in grades 6-8.

    Note: Graded on a pass/no pass basis.

  
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    EDU 413 - Elementary Student Teaching

    (4-16 credits)
    A 4- to 16-week classroom experience of observation, participation and teaching grades K-6.

    Note: Graded on a pass/no pass basis.

  
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    EDU 415 - Secondary Student Teaching

    (4-16 credits)
    A 4- to 16-week classroom experience of observation, participation and teaching grades 7-12.

    Note: Graded on a pass/no pass basis.

  
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    EDU 416 - Vertical Student Teaching

    (4-16 credits)
    A 4- to 16-week classroom experience of observation, participation and teaching grades K-12 in art, music, kinesiology or Spanish.

    Note: Graded on a pass/no pass basis.

  
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    EDU 426 - Elementary Special Education Student Teaching

    (4-8 credits)
    A 4- to 8-week experience of observation, participation and teaching students in the elementary special education classroom.

    Note: Graded on a pass/no pass basis.

  
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    EDU 428 - Secondary Special Education Student Teaching

    (4-8 credits)
    A 4- to 8-week experience of observation, participation and teaching students in the secondary special education classroom.

    Note: Graded on a pass/no pass basis.

  
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    EDU 429 - Unified Early Childhood Student Teaching

    (4-8 credits)
    This practicum endorses the student to become a teacher in an elementary multicategorical resource program for children from birth to third grade by preparing the student to schedule, evaluate, collaborate, write IEPs and IFSPs, and to develop strategies to address special needs of children.

    Note: Graded on a pass/no pass basis.

    Prerequisite: KIN104 or current first aid and infant child CPR certification.

  
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    EDU 499 - Honors Research


  
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    ENG 124 - Basic Writing

    (4 credits)
    Students learn to recognize and master the basic steps of pre-writing, drafting, and revising, and they learn specific strategies for handling any general writing task. The course begins by emphasizing expressive writing and topics drawn from the students’ personal experiences and observations.

    Note: It is required for and limited to freshmen or transfer students with ACT English scores of 19 or below (SAT below 470). This course does not count toward an English major or minor.

  
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    ENG 184 - College Writing

    (4 credits)
    An introduction to academic writing emphasizing the writing process. Students learn strategies for pre-writing, drafting, and revising of expository essays. The course also includes analysis of model essays and discussion of their ideas, and an introduction to research and research writing.

    Note: This course should be taken in the freshman year if possible. Open to students with ACT English scores of 20 or above (SAT 470 or above), as well as students who have completed ENG124 with a passing grade of C- or better. This course does not count toward an English major or minor.

  
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    ENG 220 - Introduction to Literary Study

    (4 credits)
    General Education Requirement / Option: (general education requirement under literature)

    This course invites students to read important literary works and respond to them. The course is designed for general education and is a prerequisite to many courses in the majors in English. Individual sections may emphasize historical surveys, thematic studies, or comparative approaches, in all sections students will examine various literary genres within their cultural context, learn critical reading practices, and write about literature. At root, the course explores the power of metaphor as a way of knowing ourselves and as a means of imagining others.

    Note: Does not count toward an English major or minor.

    Prerequisite: ENG184 or ACT English score of 30 or above (SAT 680 or higher).

  
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    ENG 221 - Practicum in Tutoring

    (2 credits)
    After studying the writing process and tutoring theory, students respond to the writing of others in one-on-one conferences. Students will serve as writing center tutors.

    Prerequisite: recommendation of a writing instructor.

  
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    ENG 225 - Literature of the Developing World

    (4 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    General Education Requirement / Option: (general education option under cross-cultural studies)

    To paraphrase Salman Rushdie, the Empire has written back. The last half of the 20th century has produced a number of literary texts written in English by authors from the recently independent nations of the Old British Empire. These texts have proved so rich in both literary value and cultural context that their authors, Wole Soyinka, Derek Walcott, Chinua Achebe, and Rushdie himself, have won the most prestigious literary prizes available. We will be reading and appreciating these books, both as ripping good yarns, and as significant cultural documents that teach us much of how members of other societies think, feel, and act.

    Prerequisite: ENG220.

  
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    ENG 235 - Introduction to Rhetorical Studies

    (2 credits)
    This course functions primarily as an introduction to rhetoric and rhetorical analysis. It is designed to introduce students to the major and the minor in writing and rhetoric. Topics include the rhetoric of ancient Greece, definitions of rhetoric, past and present, rhetorical analysis of texts, and analysis of the rhetor’s purpose, situation, genre and audience.

    Note: Students should attempt to take at least one other course that includes significant writing assignments during the same semester.

  
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    ENG 238 - Literature and Film

    (4 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    General Education Requirement / Option: (general education option under fine arts)

    The course introduces students to the art of adaptation of texts. Although we are frequently viewers of film, we are not always good readers and interpreters of visual texts. Students in this class will read original literary texts and then view the film adaptations of those texts. Through class discussion and writing about adaptations, students will learn how to read a film intelligently and understand the place of film as a literary form.

    Prerequisite: ENG220.

  
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    ENG 277 - Teaching Literature to Adolescents

    (2 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    A study of and practice in the teaching of literature, especially literature appropriate for young adults, with the goal of preparing students to teach English in junior high and high school. Topics: selecting literature, eliciting response, oral interpretation, integrating the language arts, and assessment.

    Prerequisite: ENG296 or 294 or permission of instructor. Students taking ENG308x should take this course during the same semester.

  
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    ENG 280 - Shakespeare

    (4 credits)
    William Shakespeare never attended college, yet he saw the world sharply in his mind’s eye. He wrote piercingly about kings and college students, warriors and witches, goblins and gravediggers, his 1,000 characters have never been off the stage in 400 years. In this course we read eight plays which fathom the range of human experience and bring the English language to its height of expressive beauty.

  
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    ENG 283 - Grammar in the Classroom

    (2 credits)
    Most middle schools and high schools expect their English teachers to teach writing and grammar. What are the goals of teaching grammar? What grammar should young writers know? This course takes a rhetorical approach to the study of grammar and how it can be used in the teaching of writing.

    Prerequisite: ENG184 or permission of instructor.

  
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    ENG 288 - Writing in the Professions

    (2 credits)
    A study of professional writing. In a writing workshop setting, students will learn to adjust style, tone and content to accomplish a definite purpose with an identified audience. They will also learn strategies for creating texts that are clear, concise and accurate. The course is especially useful for those whose career goals require facility in written communication, such as those studying marketing, public relations, advertising, management or law. All students will choose a professional to be their mentor on a writing project related to the career they are interested in. Students will also build a small portfolio of professional writing that includes letters, a memo, a resume and a research report.

    Prerequisites: sophomore class standing and ENG184 or ACT English score of 30 or above (SAT 680 or higher).

  
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    ENG 290 - The Art of the Essay

    (2 credits)
    A study of some of the best contemporary American non-fiction writing on such subjects as politics, the arts, religion, natural science and medicine. Students write on similar topics and develop their own style by emulating such models.

    Prerequisites: sophomore class standing and ENG184 or ACT English score of 30 or above (SAT 680 or higher), or permission of instructor.

  
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    ENG 294 - Reading and Writing Short Fiction

    (4 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    Students will explore the nature and design of fiction by studying and analyzing a range of short fictional genres, learning to read fiction the way its writers read it, and participating in a fiction writing workshop. Attention will be given to purposes of language, to relationships between reading and writing, and to narrative as a mode of thinking and an expression of culture.

    Prerequisite: ENG184 or ACT English score of 30 or above (SAT 680 or higher).

  
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    ENG 296 - Reading and Writing Poetry

    (4 credits)
    Students will actively explore the nature and design of poetry by studying a range of poetic genres and styles, learning to read poetry as writers do, and writing poetry in a writing workshop. Attention will be given to the purposes of language, to relationships between reading and writing, and to poetry as a mode of thinking and an expression of culture.

    Prerequisite: ENG184 or ACT English score of 30 or above (SAT 680 or higher).

  
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    ENG 297 - The Rhetoric of Persuasion

    (2 credits)
    A study of the methods of persuasion: logical and emotional appeals and trustworthiness, ways of structuring arguments, and persuasive style. Students will learn to create and critique arguments on a variety of subjects.

    Prerequisites: sophomore class standing and ENG184 or ACT English score of 30 or above (SAT 680 or higher), or permission of instructor.

  
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    ENG 308x - Methods of Teaching Secondary English and Speech

    (2 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    A study and practice of methods for teaching English and speech in high school and junior high school. Topics include language and language learning, composition, oral language, planning, curriculum and assessment.

    Note: Does not count toward a major or minor.

    Cross-Referenced: Cross-referenced in theatre/speech.
  
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    ENG 345 - Linguistic Perspectives on English

    (4 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    Where did our language come from? How did English get the biggest vocabulary of any modern language? How are the words joust, yoke, and yoga related? Why is English spelling so irregular? Are there bad words? This course traces the 1500 year development of our language, from the Germanic tongue of Beowulf to the Frenchified language of Chaucer, to the many varieties of modern English spoken around the world.

  
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    ENG 346 - American Literature I

    (4 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    A study of prose and poetry in the United States from America’s beginnings through the end of the Civil War. The course will focus on the works of Colonial and Romantic writers and the literatures of Native and African Americans. Special attention will be given to defining the qualities and concerns that make this literature distinctively “American.”

    Prerequisite: ENG220.

  
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    ENG 347 - American Literature II

    (4 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    A study of prose and poetry in the United States from the Civil War until the present. The course will study works by realists (including regionalists) and modernists, as well as contemporary writers.

    Prerequisite: ENG220.

  
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    ENG 376 - Medieval Literature

    (4 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    The Middle Ages was a Christian millennium. Authors, philosophers, astronomers and economists pursued their calling within a Christian worldview and a Catholic power structure. When warlike Anglo-Saxons imagined the crucifixion, they saw a heroic prince stripping for battle and mounting the cross in triumph. Medieval dramatists recreated the entire pageant of biblical history on a long summer’s day. In this course we read literary and historical works by both men and women, including Beowulf, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, and the Canterbury Tales.

    Prerequisite: ENG220.

  
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    ENG 377 - English Renaissance Literature

    (4 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    Like our own age, the Renaissance saw spiritual perspectives and secular perspectives in conflict and in synthesis. Writers, like seafarers, expanded our understanding of what it is to be human in this world. In this course we read plays, speeches, and poems by such authors as Shakespeare, Elizabeth I, Donne and Milton.

    Prerequisite: ENG220.

  
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    ENG 378 - English Nineteenth-Century Literature

    (4 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    The industrial revolution resulted in an urbanized, more literate population. Writers of the time sought to reach a popular audience in a way unparalleled in English literary history. We shall read Austen, Wordsworth, Dickens, Eliot and their contemporaries, examining what they thought of and had to say to the common people of their day.

    Prerequisite: ENG220.

  
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    ENG 379 - English Twentieth-Century Literature

    (4 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    England was largely depopulated of young men and nearly reduced to rubble by two world wars. The nation that arose, stripped of its empire, has continued to be a literary center. We shall read Shaw, Yeats, Eliot, Heaney and others, examining how they have analyzed and expressed the modern human condition.

    Prerequisite: ENG220.

  
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    ENG 380 - Special Topics in Writing

    (2-4 credits)
    Specific subject matter of this course will vary from semester to semester, but will always focus on an issue in composition studies or a genre of writing. Courses will include both readings and student writing within the genre and will be designed to welcome both majors and non-majors.

    Note: The course may be taken more than once as long as the topic of study is different, and will count toward the advanced writing course general education requirement.

    Prerequisite: ENG184 or ACT English score of 30 or above (SAT 680 or higher).

  
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    ENG 385 - Literature of Place

    (4 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    Some writers are especially interested in the ways people transform places and the ways places influence people. The elements of a place–the mountain ranges, shopping malls, grasslands, forests, migratory patterns of animals, rush of automobiles, or the portals of cyber-places– shape the imagination. This course examines significant literary works, especially non-fiction, that explore the relationship between persons and places. In particular, we will examine the tension between the writer’s need to construct definitions of “home places” and how the places themselves respond to human “home making.”

    Prerequisite: ENG220

  
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    ENG 386 - The Other America

    (4 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    General Education Requirement / Option: (general education option under cross-cultural studies)

    America is home to a variety of peoples and literatures, this course focuses on the development of literatures produced by those outside the Anglo-European tradition whose experiences tell a different story about America. The goal of the course is to enrich students’ views of the content of American Literature and to familiarize them with a culture or cultures with which they may not be conversant. The course may be taught as African American, Native American, Asian American, or Hispanic American literature. Alternatively, the instructor may choose to focus on literatures in contact and conflict with one another, for example, the turbulent confluence of Native American, Anglo, and Hispanic Literatures of Nueva España.

    Note: See the instructor for the specific offering before enrolling. This course may be taken more than once, provided a different literature is studied.

    Prerequisite: ENG220.

  
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    ENG 387 - Special Topics in Rhetoric

    (2-4 credits, non-yearly, consult department)
    Specific subject matter of this course will vary from semester to semester, but will always focus on an issue in rhetorical studies or a genre of writing. Courses with writing as their emphasis will include both readings and student writing within the genre.

    Note: The course will be designed to welcome both majors and non-majors. The course may be taken more than once as long as the topic of study is different.

    Prerequisite: ENG184 or ACT English score of 30 or above (SAT 680 or higher).

  
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    ENG 398 - Directed Study


  
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    ENG 401 - History and Theory of Rhetoric

    (4 credits)
    Designed to provide solid grounding in Greek and Roman rhetorical theory and practice including studies in pre-literate rhetoric and the theories of Aristotle and Plato, among others. Some attention is also given to the Christianizing of rhetorical theory during the Middle Ages. Finally, the course concludes with the examination of trends in contemporary rhetoric studies and topical applications.

    Prerequisite: junior class standing, ENG235 recommended.

  
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    ENG 410 - Seminar in Interpretation

    (4 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    In this course we study basic problems in understanding literary texts. We explore solutions offered by various critical schools (structuralism, psychoanalysis, New Historicism, reception-aesthetics), examining both their inherent logic and their applicability to a particular text.

  
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    ENG 417 - Internship

    (4 credits may apply toward the major)
  
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    ENG 420 - Advanced Writing Project

    (4 credits)
    The heart of the course is an advanced project in artistic, journalistic, or scholarly writing. Students also assemble a portfolio of their best writing and related work, plan writing or study beyond college, and read to gather perspectives on their vocation.

    Prerequisite: Open to senior-standing majors and minors in English, Writing and Rhetoric, and Journalism, or permission of instructor.

  
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    ENG 480 - Special Topics in Literature and Culture

    (4 credits, non-yearly, consult department)
    In this seminar we analyze interpretive problems in literature and their relation to cultural theories and conditions. Particular attention is given to questions germane to Christian experience and thought.

    Note: Specific subject matter will vary from year to year and might include such topics as a literary period, a national literature, a specific author, or literary genre. This course may be taken more than once provided a different topic is studied.

  
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    ENG 499 - Honors Research


  
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    ESL 101 - Introduction to American Culture

    (2 credits)
    An introduction to American cultural traits and social and religious customs for international students beginning their studies in the United States. Special focus will be given to local Midwestern culture and rural issues.

    Note: This course is limited to students studying English as a second language.

  
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    ESL 201 - Oral English

    (4 credits)
    Extensive training and practice in speaking English and comprehending spoken English. Emphasis upon the development of listening comprehension strategies, idiomatic vocabulary, and skills in rephrasing, interrogation, and verification. Each student will be pretested in pronunciation, listening comprehension, speaking and vocabulary. Tutorials and materials appropriate to the student’s present proficiency will be utilized, as well as large group presentations and activities.

    Prerequisite: This class is open only to ESL students with a concurrent enrollment in ESL101, or permission of instructor.

  
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    ESL 202 - ESL Bible

    (4 credits)
    The Bible is the foundation for the Jewish and Christian traditions, and has powerfully influenced every dimension of Western Civilization. By studying the Bible, students gain access to the heart of the Judaic-Christian traditions and build a foundation for better understanding Western philosophy, literature, art, music, law and history. In this course, ESL students read selections from the English Bible as well as short excerpts from pieces of Western Literature that have been inspired by the Bible. The aim is both to improve English reading, writing, and speaking skills and also better appreciate the cultural importance of the Jewish and Christian scriptures. Time permitting, students may rehearse and perform in English a short one-act drama based upon a classic Bible story.

    Prerequisites: ESL101, 201, and 203, or permission of instructor.

  
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    ESL 203 - ESL Writing

    (4 credits)
    The study and practice of formal and informal modes of written communication accepted in American academic work. Intensive work will be done to develop fluency in writing and reading, expand vocabulary, diagnose and remediate grammatical deficiencies and train students to identify and correct their own mistakes.

    Prerequisite: this class is open only to ESL students with a concurrent enrollment in ESL201 or ESL251, or permission of instructor.

  
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    ESL 204 - ESL Literature

    (4 credits)
    A study at the intermediate level of English language literature, emphasis will be placed on the development of reading skills and reading strategies through an introduction to literature in the English language. Students will learn how to effectively read a literary text in English, including the development of vocabulary and grammar recognition.

    Prerequisites: ESL101, 201, and concurrent enrollment in ESL203, or permission of instructor.

  
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    ESL 205 - Business English

    (2 credits)
    This course is designed to meet the needs of international students who intend to study business at an American institution or whose primary reason in learning English is for conducting business. The course focuses on learning business concepts and terminology as well as improving communication skills.

    Prerequisites: ESL251 or 201, and concurrent enrollment in ESL203, or permission of instructor.

  
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    ESL 206 - English for Academic Purposes

    (4 credits)
    This course is designed to meet the needs of international students who intend to pursue undergraduate and/or graduate studies in the United States. The course focuses on preparing students for the demands of academic lecture comprehension, note- taking, and also on improving writing skills in evaluating and organizing material as well as predicting upcoming information. In addition, students will practice reading strategies to improve textbook comprehension.

    Prerequisites: ESL101, 201, and 203, or permission of instructor.

  
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    ESL 251 - Advanced Oral English

    (4 credits)
    Continued training and practice in speaking English and comprehending spoken English. Emphasis upon the development of listening comprehension strategies, development of idiomatic vocabulary, skills in paraphrasing, initiating conversation, interrogation, note taking and verification, and the writing of short essays on comparative-cultural topics. Training and practice in college reading strategies toward the dual goal of increased speed and comprehension. Individual work on pronunciation problems.

    Note: Required of students with TOEFL scores under 525.

    Prerequisite: This class is open only to ESL students with the prerequisite of ESL201 or permission of instructor.

  
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    FRE 101 - Beginning French Language and Culture

    (3 credits)
    Combined study of language and culture. Study of major social systems and themes of the culture. An elementary study of the language in a communicative context. Emphasis upon integration of developing language skills with cultural understanding and sensitivity in oral communication settings.

    Note: Required weekly drill sessions to practice material studied in class.

    Prerequisite: no previous study of French, or placement by the foreign language placement exam.

  
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    FRE 102 - Beginning French Language and Culture

    (3 credits)
    Combined study of language and culture. Study of major social systems and themes of the culture. Building on previously acquired ability in French, an elementary study of the language in a communicative context. Emphasis upon integration of developing language skills with cultural understanding and sensitivity in oral communication settings.

    Note: Required weekly drill sessions to practice material studied in class.

    Prerequisite: FRE101, or placement by the foreign language placement exam.

  
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    FRE 201 - Intermediate French Language and Culture

    (3 credits)
    General Education Requirement / Option: (general education option under language)

    Combined study of French language and culture. Building on previously acquired ability in French, integration of language skills with cultural understanding and sensitivity in oral communication settings with emphasis on pronunciation. Development of reading and writing skills.

    Prerequisite: FRE102, or placement by the foreign language placement exam.

  
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    FRE 202 - Intermediate French Language and Culture

    (3 credits)
    Combined study of French language and culture. Building on previously acquired ability in French, integration of language skills with cultural understanding and sensitivity in oral communication settings with emphasis on pronunciation. Development of reading and writing skills.

    Prerequisite: FRE201, or placement by the foreign language placement exam.

  
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    GEN 101 - Introduction to Christian Liberal Arts

    (2 credits)
    In ICLA, the student will learn to recognize a Christian academic community that starkly contrasts from high school. We will represent the Christian liberal arts as a lived profession, discussing the ideal qualities of its members: the critical, active mind; thoughtful communication; and displaying a rigor in subjecting their scholarship to the demands of the cross, while examining the cross under the light of their academic work.

  
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    GEN 141 - Leadership I

    (2 credits)
    Leadership I will introduce students to the idea of servant leadership. Students will work with professors and mentors to understand and learn to practice servant leadership. Reading, reflection, and service learning components will be incorporated into the class. Students will begin planning for the NWC College Leadership Conference. It is hoped that students will also sign up for Leadership II following the completion of Leadership I.

  
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    GEN 142 - Leadership II

    (2 credits)
    Leadership II will continue teaching and helping students learn about the concept of servant leadership. The class will finish planning and implement the NWC College Student Leadership Conference. Reading, reflection, and service learning components will be incorporated into the class.

    Prerequisite: GEN141.

  
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    GEN 205 - Interdisciplinary Honors Seminar

    (2 credits)
    A seminar designed to expose Honors Program students to significant issues by means of interdisciplinary study of selected topics chose on a year-to-year basis.

    Note: May be taken more than once provided a different seminar is offered. Must be taken twice to fulfill graduation requirements for the Honors Program. Students may elect to take this course on an “A”/pass/no pass basis. Up to four credits of GEN205 may be substituted for general education requirements if GEN205 seminars are taken for a letter grade.

    Prerequisite: membership in the Honors Program or special permission from Honors Program directors.

  
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    GEN 304 - Los Angeles Film Studies/Seminars


  
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    GEN 312 - Foundations for Media Involvement


  
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    GEN 312 - Reporting in Washington


  
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    GEN 312 - Washington, News & Public


  
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    GEN 313 - Area Studies

    (4 credits; non-yearly, consult department).
    General Education Requirement / Option: (general education option under cross-cultural studies)

    Course designed to introduce students to the phenomenon of a particular culture(s).

    Note: Topics covered will vary, depending on subject interest of faculty.

 

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