2012-13 Catalog 
    
    Aug 18, 2022  
2012-13 Catalog [Archived Catalog]

Courses


 
  
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    SPA 331 - Introduction to Translation and Interpreting

    (3 credits)
    An introduction to the related fields of translation and interpreting. Students will be introduced to the different theories and techniques of translation and interpreting, the differences between the two fields and within each field, ethical and moral considerations for translators and interpreters, the role of translating and the translator as well as interpreting and the interpreter, and the modes of interpreting including consecutive, simultaneous and sight-translation. Students will apply the theoretical principals by working primarily from their B language to their A language for both translation and interpreting.

    Prerequisites: SPA202 and two 3-credit 300 level Spanish courses, or by permission of instructor.

  
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    SPA 332 - Interpreting I

    (3 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    An in-depth study of interpreting at the introductory level between Spanish and English, with both theoretical background knowledge and applied practice included. Specific topic areas covered involve legal, medical and religious interpreting.

    Prerequisites: SPA331.

  
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    SPA 333 - Interpreting II

    (3 credits; alternate years, consult department)
    An intermediate level course taken after completion of Interpreting I, students will continue to strengthen their skills in sight-translation and short and long consecutive interpreting while beginning in-depth study of simultaneous interpreting. Students will reinforce their interpreting techniques by applying consecutive interpreting strategies to simultaneous interpreting. Course material will broaden from legal, medical and religious interpreting to include other areas such as science and politics, and will include continued discussion of moral, ethical and Christian considerations for interpreters. Although primarily from Language B to A, students will also begin to interpret from their A language into their B language more and more.

    Prerequisites: SPA331 & 332

  
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    SPA 334 - Interpreting III

    (3 credits; alternate years, consult department)
    An advanced level course taken after completion of Interpreting II, students will consolidate their skills in sight-translation and short and long consecutive interpreting while primarily focusing on simultaneous interpreting. Students will deepen and reinforce their simultaneous interpreting abilities with the addition of new strategies, skills building exercises and practice techniques. Course material will include a broad range of materials from the legal, medical, religious, scientific, political and other fields and will increasingly be from real-world situations. Continued discussion of moral, ethical and Christian considerations for interpreters. Students will interpret both from their B language into their A language as well as A to B.

    Prerequisites: SPA 331, 332 & 333.

  
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    SPA 336 - Translation I

    (3 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    This course is an introduction to the theory, methods, techniques and problems involved in basic translation. The first half of the semester will focus mostly on translating from Spanish to English. The second half of the course will involve general material from specific areas of life: popular culture, music, social sciences, education, business, medicine, the legal profession, etc., with translation exercises from both Spanish to English and English to Spanish.

    Prerequisites: SPA331.

  
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    SPA 337 - Translation II

    (3 credits; alternate years, consult department)
    An intermediate level course taken after completion of Translation I, students will continue to strengthen their skills in translation by becoming more adept at applying the theory, methods and techniques first introduced in earlier courses. Course material will come from a broad array of legal, medical, religious, scientific and political sources, as well as materials stemming from community needs. Although primarily from Language B to A, students will also increasingly translate from their A language into their B language more and more.

    Prerequisites: SPA 331 & 336.

  
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    SPA 338 - Translation III

    (3 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    An advanced level course taken after completion of Translation II, students will consolidate their skills in translation. Students will learn how to improve earlier translations (either from their own translation or from others) as they target their translations for specific audiences. Course material will come from a broad array of legal, medical, religious, scientific and political sources, as well as materials stemming from community needs. Course material will be longer in nature and more challenging than that of Translation II. Students will translate both from their Language B into their Language A as well as A to B.

    Prerequisites: SPA331, 336 & 337.

  
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    SPA 344 - Practicum in Spanish

    (2 credits)
    Designed for advanced Spanish students, this practicum gives students the opportunity to practice their Spanish on a daily basis in a Spanish speaking environment. Emphasis is placed on the development of oral communication, both speaking and listening. Placement opportunities include, but are not limited to, living in the Northwestern College Spanish house or with a Spanish speaking Hispanic family.

    Note: Minimum 14 week placement to receive credit. Graded on a pass/no pass basis. May be repeated. Up to four credits may be applied to the major.

    Prerequisite: SPA202. Enrollment through permission of modern foreign languages department.

  
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    SPA 345 - Practicum in Translation and Interpreting

    (2 credits, consult department)
    Designed for advanced translation and interpreting students, this practicum gives students the opportunity to practice their professional skills in a real world environment.

    Note: Graded on a pass/no pass basis.

    Prerequisites: SPA334 , 338 & permission of the MFL department.

  
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    SPA 351 - Survey of Hispanic Literature from Spain

    (3 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    A study of peninsular Spanish literature from El Cid to the present. Emphasis upon major literary movements and their representative masterpieces.

    Note: Taught in Spanish.

    Prerequisite: SPA314 or permission of instructor.

  
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    SPA 352 - Survey of Hispanic Literature from the Americas

    (3 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    A study of Spanish Latin-American literature from the colonial period to the present. Emphasis upon major literary movements and their representative masterpieces.

    Note: Taught in Spanish.

    Prerequisite: SPA314 or permission of instructor.

  
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    SPA 365 - Special Topics in Language

    (2-4 credits)
    See course description for LAN365.

  
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    SPA 376 - Study Abroad Cross-Cultural Preparation

    (1 credit)
    Lack of cross-cultural competence and sensitivity is a prominent cause of much frustration and anger between visitors to a country and the individuals living in that country. In preparation for their semester study abroad, in this course students will learn common cross-cultural skills and become aware of the joys and challenges they will face in those months. They will also spend time learning about the country in which they will be studying so they are well-versed in the basic historical, political, economic, social and cultural issues that country has dealt with and is dealing with.

    Prerequisite: Acceptance into a study abroad program approved by Northwestern College for Spanish majors.

  
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    SPA 377 - Enhancing the Study Abroad Experience

    (1 credit)
    Semester study abroad trips have two interweaving tracks: the external experience, where we encounter the new world in which we are living, and the internal experience, where we visit new places with ourselves. Writing a journal affords the student the opportunity to wrap these two journeys together and end up with a vibrant account of his/her experience - a keepsake that helps him/her remember and learn from the semester study abroad. Thus, a travel journal is the ultimate souvenir. To complete the requirements for this course, students will write a journal during their semester study abroad experience as well as write a final essay reflecting on both the semester abroad and their entire foreign-language collegiate experience.

    Prerequisite: Acceptance into a study abroad program approved by Northwestern College for Spanish majors

  
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    SPA 398 - Directed Study


  
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    SPA 417 - Internship

    (2 credits may apply toward the major or minor)
  
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    SPA 499 - Honors Research


  
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    SSC 308 - Methods of Teaching Secondary Social Science

    (2 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    The content, technique and materials for teaching social science at the secondary level (for economic, history, political science, social science and sociology majors).

    Note: Credit does not count toward the major.

  
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    SWK 140 - Introduction to Social Work

    (4 credits)
    This course presents a history of the social work profession and social work practice. It incorporates the major fields of social work and the concepts and theories needed to understand the social, cultural, political, ethical and religious context that provides the ecological framework of social work practice, and it enables a thorough understanding of at-risk populations and of the problems which social work must address. Included are visits to agencies and guest lectures by social workers from the field. A central concern is the Christian’s individual and collective responsibility for the health and welfare of fellow human beings.

    Note: Transfer credits will be evaluated on a course-by-course basis. No academic credit will be granted for social work courses taken in programs which are not accredited by the Council on Social Work Education. No academic credit will be granted, in whole or in part, for life experience or work experience.

  
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    SWK 210 - Direct Helping Skills

    (2 credits)
    This course is designed to help students develop basic interviewing skills and techniques in the area of social work. This course will provide foundational skills in interviewing so that students can work effectively with individuals, families and groups from all diverse populations. Different techniques of interviewing and theoretical principles of interviewing will be investigated. Students will increase their practical skills through the use of an interactive learning environment and through intensive use of video feedback and role playing.

    Note: Transfer credits will be evaluated on a course-by-course basis. No academic credit will be granted for social work courses taken in programs which are not accredited by the Council on Social Work Education. No academic credit will be granted, in whole or in part, for life experience or work experience.

    Prerequisites: PSY111 or SWK140 or SOC101.

  
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    SWK 220 - Qualitative Research

    (3 credits)
    The course prepares students to engage in qualitative inquiry and research designs, including narrative research, phenomenology, grounded theory, case study, participatory action research, focus groups, and ethnography. Comparative analysis of approaches, paradigmatic controversies, and mixed model designs are discussed. The course reviews strategies of inquiry, sampling methods, data collection, and analysis.

    Note: Transfer credits will be evaluated on a course-by-course basis. No academic credit will be granted for social work courses taken in programs which are not accredited by the Council on Social Work Education. No academic credit will be granted, in whole or in part, for life experience or work experience.

    Prerequisites: SWK210 and PSY215.

  
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    SWK 230 - Topics in Social Work

    (2-4 credits)
    A study of selected topics in social work which are not adequately covered in other courses. This course would be offered as a response to student or faculty needs and/or interests. Possible topics could include: child welfare, grief and loss, crisis intervention, gerontology, disabilities, mental health, violence/abuse, health care issues and policy, international social work, substance abuse and diversity issues.

    Note: This course may be taken more than once provided a different topic is studied. Transfer credits will be evaluated on a course-by-course basis. No academic credit will be granted for social work courses taken in programs which are not accredited by the Council on Social Work Education. No academic credit will be granted, in whole or in part, for life experience or work experience.

  
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    SWK 231 - Human Behavior and the Social Environment (HBSE)

    (4 credits)
    HBSE focuses on interaction between an individual’s development and the functioning of groups, organizations and communities. This course is the foundation course in the human behavior and the social environment sequence to prepare baccalaureate students for general practice. It utilizes the person-in-the-environment perspective to integrate theoretical knowledge and research from the human, biological, psychological and social sciences in understanding human behavior. Human development across the life span within the context of the influence of ethnicity, race, culture, gender, social class, age, sexual orientation and disability is specifically addressed in an attempt to understand human behavior.

    Note: Transfer credits will be evaluated on a course-by-course basis. No academic credit will be granted for social work courses taken in programs which are not accredited by the Council on Social Work Education. No academic credit will be granted, in whole or in part, for life experience or work experience.

    Prerequisites: PSY111, SWK140, SOC101, or permission of instructor.

  
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    SWK 232 - At-Risk Populations and Social Justice

    (4 credits)
    Examines theoretical foundations for understanding dynamics of social inequity, privilege, and oppression; focus on diversity and on populations at risk due to racism, sexism and classism; self-assessment of students’ racial and cultural heritage as it shapes their attitudes and biases toward different cultural and racial groups; emphasis on helping students become culturally competent social workers who are grounded in their faith and who identify with the profession’s respect for diversity and commitment to social and economic justice. Open to non-majors.

    Note: Transfer credits will be evaluated on a course-by-course basis. No academic credit will be granted for social work courses taken in programs which are not accredited by the Council on Social Work Education. No academic credit will be granted, in whole or in part, for life experience or work experience.

    Prerequisites: PSY111, SWK231, SOC101, or permission of instructor.

  
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    SWK 360 - Social Policy and Social Work Advocacy

    (3 credits)
    Examines social policy development and the political process, with special attention to the poor and disadvantaged. This course will assist students in acquiring skills to see the inadequacies, gaps and inequities in social policies in the past and present and help them develop critical thinking and advocacy skills, plus a commitment to change.

    Note: Transfer credits will be evaluated on a course-by-course basis. No academic credit will be granted for social work courses taken in programs which are not accredited by the Council on Social Work Education. No academic credit will be granted, in whole or in part, for life experience or work experience.

  
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    SWK 370 - Individual/Family Theory & Practice

    (4 credits)
    This course examines therapeutic theories and models of directed practice with individuals and family systems. Emphasis is on etiology, diagnosis, and assessment with the application of psychosocial history, treatment plans, crisis intervention plans, and use of diagnostic tools, such as the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual IV (current edition). The course reviews evidence-based research for generalist practice with diverse population groups.

    Note: Open to social work majors only. Transfer credits will be evaluated on a course-by-course basis. No academic credit will be granted for social work courses taken in programs which are not accredited by the Council on Social Work Education. No academic credit will be granted, in whole or in part, for life experience or work experience.

    Prerequisites: PSY215, SWK140 and 231.

  
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    SWK 376 - Group Theory and Practice

    (3 credits)
    Develops a framework for how people groups form, group development formation, group leadership skills, theoretical approaches to group work, and ethical considerations in group work, including diversity issues. Students will be involved in an interactive group lab and service-learning group project.

    Note: Open to social work majors only. Transfer credits will be evaluated on a course-by-course basis. No academic credit will be granted for social work courses taken in programs which are not accredited by the Council on Social Work Education. No academic credit will be granted, in whole or in part, for life experience or work experience.

    Prerequisite: SWK370. Open only to Social Work majors.

  
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    SWK 386 - Organizational and Community Development Theory

    (4 credits)
    Examines generalist Social Work practice theories and skills with organizations and communities. Students will develop competencies related to larger system practice, such as networking, community needs assessment, organizational theory and dynamics, larger system planned change processes, program evaluation, social action, community planning, grant writing, and supervision.

    Note: Open to social work majors only. Transfer credits will be evaluated on a course-by-course basis. No academic credit will be granted for social work courses taken in programs which are not accredited by the Council on Social Work Education. No academic credit will be granted, in whole or in part, for life experience or work experience.

    Prerequisite: SWK370. Open only to Social work majors.

  
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    SWK 398 - Directed Study


    Note: Transfer credits will be evaluated on a course-by-course basis. No academic credit will be granted for social work courses taken in programs which are not accredited by the Council on Social Work Education. No academic credit will be granted, in whole or in part, for life experience or work experience.

  
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    SWK 416 - Fundamental Issues in Social Work

    (3 credits)
    The intent of this course is to introduce students to the philosophical issues related to social work practice. Areas of study include a critical analysis of the profession’s role in society, and the relationships between social work values, its ethical guidelines, its knowledge base and research, and its practice skills. The course concludes with an analysis of the ethical and non-ethical issues facing practitioners and the various approaches to resolving ethical dilemmas.

    Note: Transfer credits will be evaluated on a course-by-course basis. No academic credit will be granted for social work courses taken in programs which are not accredited by the Council on Social Work Education. No academic credit will be granted, in whole or in part, for life experience or work experience.

    Prerequisites: SWK140, 231, and 370, or permission of instructor.

  
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    SWK 418 - Social Work Professional Seminar

    (2 credits)
    This course is designed to complement the student’s field placement and provide a forum in which to discuss field experiences-work assignments, problems, and ethical and non-ethical issues. The goal for this course is to help students make systematic associations between theory and practice in working with different population groups in various work settings.

    Note: Open to social work majors only. Transfer credits will be evaluated on a course-by-course basis. No academic credit will be granted for social work courses taken in programs which are not accredited by the Council on Social Work Education. No academic credit will be granted, in whole or in part, for life experience or work experience.

    Prerequisites: SWK370, 376, and 386.

  
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    SWK 419 - Social Work Practicum

    (10 credits)
    This is a field course which gives students the opportunity to practice generalist social work skills in a professional setting. The field sites are diverse, ranging from child and family services to mental health, community development and school social work. Emphasis is placed on introducing students to diverse ethnic, racial, sex and age-related group lifestyles and orientations.

    Note: Open to social work majors only. Students should take this course in the semester immediately following SWK376, Theory and Practice II unless prior permission is received from the field placement director. Graded on a pass/no pass basis. Transfer credits will be evaluated on a course-by-course basis. No academic credit will be granted for social work courses taken in programs which are not accredited by the Council on Social Work Education. No academic credit will be granted, in whole or in part, for life experience or work experience.

    Prerequisites: SWK370, 376 and 386.

  
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    SWK 499 - Honors Research


    Note: Transfer credits will be evaluated on a course-by-course basis. No academic credit will be granted for social work courses taken in programs which are not accredited by the Council on Social Work Education. No academic credit will be granted, in whole or in part, for life experience or work experience.

  
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    THE 100 - Theatre Production Ensemble

    (1/2 credit)
    This course is designed to provide students with practical experience in the many facets of theatre production. Course members audition and interview for performance and production staff positions.

    Note: Course may be repeated.

  
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    THE 101x - Mass Media and Society

    (4 credits)
    Examines the historical development, organization and structure of the mass media in contemporary society, as well as related issues and problems. Suggests Christian perspectives on use of and participation in the mass media.

    Cross-Referenced: Cross-referenced in communication studies.
  
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    THE 111 - Public Speaking

    (2 credits)
    General Education Requirement / Option: (general education option under speech)

    This course emphasizes the improvement of public speech habits and the development of proficiency in the organization and presentation of ideas.

  
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    THE 112 - Performance Studies

    (4 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    An introduction to the use of performance as a means of interpreting, analyzing and celebrating literature, and as a tool for experiencing cultural diversity and enacting social change. By providing training in the principles and techniques of performing various genres of literature before an audience, this course seeks to expand students’ understanding of the relationships between text and performer, performer and audience, and written and oral forms of literature. Assignments include solo and group performances from poetry, narrative fiction and oral history.

  
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    THE 113 - Theatre as a Fine Art

    (4 credits)
    General Education Requirement / Option: (general education option under fine arts)

    A survey course dealing with theatre as an art form, which emphasizes its history, literature and production techniques.

    Note: Does not count toward a major or minor.

  
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    THE 114 - Stagecraft

    (2 credits)
    A practical course which introduces students to the organization, skills and materials necessary for mounting a stage production.

  
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    THE 130 - Introduction to Design

    (2 credits)
    An introduction to the concepts of design necessary to approach, create and critically evaluate a theatrical performance environment. Study of the processes of script analysis, design research and communication. Breakdown of aspects and elements that define the most commonly held principles of scenery, costume, lighting and sound design.

  
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    THE 133 - Ballet

    (1 credit)
    A study of the form and techniques of ballet.

    Note: Dance courses may be repeated up to a maximum of 4 credits.

  
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    THE 135 - Jazz Dance

    (1 credit)
    A study of the form and techniques of jazz dance. Emphasis will be on the integration of modern musical performance.

    Note: Dance courses may be repeated up to a maximum of 4 credits.

  
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    THE 206 - Playwriting: The One-Act

    (2 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    A workshop approach to the study of dramatic structure culminating in the writing of a one-act play.

    Prerequisite: THE113.

  
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    THE 215 - Acting

    (4 credits)
    A study of the theoretical framework of the craft of acting.

  
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    THE 226 - Scene Design

    (2 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    An introduction to the concepts, tools and skills of scenic design for the theatre. Emphasis is placed on practical hands-on experiences reinforcing previously learned design principles.

    Prerequisite: THE130.

  
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    THE 227 - Introduction to Lighting Design

    (2 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    An introduction to the basic skills, technology and artistic principles of stage lighting design.

    Prerequisite: THE130.

  
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    THE 230 - Costume Design

    (2 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    A study of methods and approaches to costume design for the theatre.

    Prerequisite: THE130.

  
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    THE 260 - Drama Ministries Ensemble

    (1/2 credit)
    A performance group emphasizing preparation of scripts for presentation in worship services and worship-related settings.

    Note: Members are chosen by audition. Course may be repeated.

  
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    THE 305 - Story and Worship

    (4 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    The study of the story of worship as well as story within worship. An application of the principles and practices of dramatic art to worship planning and leadership, and also a study of plays within the context of Christian corporate worship.

  
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    THE 308x - Methods of Teaching Secondary English and Speech

    (2 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    A study and practice of methods for teaching English and speech in high school and junior high school. Topics include language and language learning, composition, oral language, planning, curriculum and assessment.

    Note: Does not count toward a major or minor.

    Prerequisites: EDU102 and ENG220.

    Cross-Referenced: Cross-referenced in English.
  
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    THE 312 - Directing

    (4 credits)
    Beginning directors review the guiding principles of theatrical art and then apply these to script selection, development of a prompt script, and the complete rehearsal process. Each student prepares a short play for public performance.

    Prerequisites: THE113 and215 or permission of instructor.

  
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    THE 315 - Acting: Scene Work

    (4 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    Students perform scenes from classical, modern and contemporary literature. Emphasis is placed on script analysis.

    Prerequisite: THE215.

  
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    THE 328 - Advanced Lighting Design

    (2 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    An opportunity to apply the basic skills, technology and artistic principles of lighting design to script response, visual research and creative exploration. The capstone experience of the course will be for students to design lighting for a mounted one-act play.

    Prerequisites: THE130 and 227.

  
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    THE 343 - History and Theory I

    (4 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    A study of the development of the history and theory of theatre from its origins through the neoclassical period.

  
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    THE 344 - History and Theory II

    (4 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    A study of the development of the history and theory of the theatre from the English Restoration through the postmodern era.

  
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    THE 360x - Film Aesthetics and Criticism

    (4 credits; alternate years, consult department)
    General Education Requirement / Option: (general education option under fine arts)

    This course is an examination of film as one of the dominant art forms and influencer’s of our culture. We will look at film form, genres and content, and we will do film critique.
     

    Cross-Referenced: Cross-referenced in communications.
  
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    THE 365x - Acting for the Camera

    (3 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    Study and practice of acting skills and techniques in front of cameras using scenes from television, film, commercials and industrial scripts. Course also includes sections on audition techniques and the business of acting.

    Prerequisite: THE215, COM202, or permission of instructor.

    Cross-Referenced: Cross-referenced in communication studies.
  
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    THE 398 - Directed Study


  
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    THE 405 - Practicum in Christian Theatre

    (2 credits)
    A theatre laboratory experience using drama in a Christian context.

    Note: Graded on a pass/no pass basis.

    Prerequisites: theatre major and a career concentration in Christian theatre ministries.

  
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    THE 406 - Topics in Dramatic Literature

    (2 credits)
    Specific subject matter of this course will vary from semester to semester, but will focus on the study of dramatic literature from one genre or one playwright or one geographical area or one theme/value.

    Note: The course will be designed to welcome both majors and non- majors. The course may be taken more than once as long as the topic of study is different.

    Prerequisite: THE113.

  
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    THE 407 - Playwriting: The Full-Length

    (4 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    This continuation of the study of playwriting focuses on the challenges of the long form. The course includes the processes of writing according to classic structural principles, rewriting, formatting and submitting plays for publication.

    Prerequisite: THE206 or permission of instructor.

  
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    THE 417 - Internship

    (4 credits may apply toward the major)
  
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    THE 465 - Selected Topics in Theatre and Speech

    (2-4 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    This course will focus on various issues of theatre and speech that are not covered in current course offerings. Possible topics might include: auditioning, stage management, musical theatre, contemporary theatre since 1967, specific genres (comedy, tragedy, theatre of the absurd, Greek, etc.), theatre as social criticism, ethnic theatre, theatre as historical documentary.

    Note: May be taken more than once, provided a different topic is studied.

  
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    THE 499 - Honors Research


  
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    TSL 207 - TESL Grammar

    (2 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    Study of English grammar as it applies to the teaching of English as a second language. Designed for active speakers of English who anticipate teaching ESL and wish to learn about those grammar topics of concern to ESL students.

  
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    TSL 222 - Practicum in TESL

    (2 credits)
    Designed primarily for students who plan to teach English as a second language but who are not part of the TESL endorsement, this practicum places TESL minor students in an ESL teaching setting, primarily with recent immigrants in Sioux County. Students teach ESL to immigrants, either on a one-to-one basis or with small groups.

    Note: Not applicable to the TESL endorsement. May be repeated. Graded on a pass/no pass basis.

    Prerequisite: 201 proficiency in a foreign language, TSL307 or permission of instructor.

  
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    TSL 224 - Applied Linguistics in Language Education

    (4 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    The course is a survey of key issues in socio-and applied linguistic inquiry on case studies of topics such as the nature of language, bilingualism and bilingual education as well as language planning and language policy.

  
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    TSL 225 - Language Development and Acquisition

    (3 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    This course will examine the similarities and differences between the acquisition of first and second languages.

  
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    TSL 307 - Methods in TESL (Teaching English as a Second Language)

    (3 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    Study of the unique problems and opportunities in teaching English to classes made up of individuals from heterogeneous language backgrounds. Discussion of recent research, methodology and grammar concepts unique to ESL.

    Note: Intended for those contemplating teaching ESL.

    Prerequisite: one year of a foreign language or permission of instructor.

 

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