2012-13 Catalog 
    
    Aug 18, 2022  
2012-13 Catalog [Archived Catalog]

Courses


 
  
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    PHY 370 - Modern Physics

    (4 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    For students seeking a minor in physics or those interested in obtaining a physics teaching endorsement. Topics will include special relativity, quantized energy and momentum, Schrodinger’s Equation, nuclear and particle physics, and cosmology.

    Note: There is a laboratory component to this course.

    Prerequisites: successful completion of PHY212 with a grade of C- or higher, or permission of instructor.

  
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    PHY 398 - Directed Study


  
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    PHY 417 - Internship


  
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    PHY 433x - Introductory Physical Chemistry

    (4 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    An introductory course in chemical thermodynamics, quantum chemistry and chemical kinetics.

    Note: Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory period per week.

    Prerequisites: MAT112 and 211, and CHE112 or PHY212.

    Cross-Referenced: Cross-referenced in chemistry.
  
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    PHY 436x - Intermediate Physical Chemistry

    (4 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    An intermediate course in chemical thermodynamics, quantum chemistry and chemical kinetics.

    Note: Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory period per week.

    Prerequisite: PHY433x.

    Cross-Referenced: Cross-referenced in chemistry.
  
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    PHY 499 - Honors Research


  
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    PSC 101 - American National Government

    (4 credits)
    General Education Requirement / Option: (general education option under social science) (American politics)

    A broad survey of the major political and governmental institutions in the United States. This course examines how citizens attempt to influence their government and how the government responds. The course also develops the foundations for a biblical perspective on the role of government and the role of citizens.

  
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    PSC 105 - Political Ideologies

    (4 credits)
    General Education Requirement / Option: (general education option under social science) (American politics)

    A survey of contemporary political ideologies such as liberalism, conservatism, socialism, and others. Students will seek to understand the relevance of these ideologies for public policy, and will seek to develop a Christian perspective on, and critique of, contemporary ideologies.

  
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    PSC 201 - State and Local Government

    (2 credits) (American politics)
    This course examines the political relationships between the federal, state and local levels of U.S. government. Though we focus primarily on state and local governments and policy making, we also seek to determine which level of government is best suited to address the different social and economic problems. The role of the Christian in politics is also explored.

  
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    PSC 210x - Introduction to Political Philosophy

    (4 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    General Education Requirement / Option: (general education option under philosophy)

    This course introduces the student to philosophy by means of an examination of the main questions of normative social and political theory. It examines such matters as the justification and purpose of government, anarchism, justice, equality and human rights.

    Cross-Referenced: Cross-referenced in philosophy.
  
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    PSC 220 - Politics and Public Policy

    (4 credits, alternate years, consult department) (American politics)
    A general examination of domestic and foreign policies of the United States. Education, health care, civil rights and economic policy are among the various polices explored. Particular attention is given to the differences between Christian liberal and Christian conservative policy perspectives of problems such as crime, discrimination, poverty, degradation of the environment and others.

  
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    PSC 225 - Introduction to Law

    (4 credits, alternate years, consult department) (American politics)
    This course briefly surveys the landscape of the American legal system. Most of the course, however, is devoted to examining significant constitutional issues, such as government powers, civil rights and civil liberties.

  
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    PSC 230 - International Relations

    (4 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    An introduction to basic concepts in the study of the modern states system. We will study especially the problem of war and diplomacy in an “anarchical society.” In addition, we will explore some Christian perspectives on the theory and practice of international relations, especially the contested concept of sovereignty.

  
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    PSC 235 - Comparative Politics

    (4 credits)
    General Education Requirement / Option: (general education option under cross-cultural studies)

    A broad survey of politics, political change, political institutions and public policy in several selected countries from different continents. Contrasts with the United States are emphasized and special attention is paid to historical development, ideological, religious and social factors.

  
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    PSC 260 - Human Geography

    (4 credits)
    General Education Requirement / Option: (general education option under cross-cultural studies)

    This course introduces the study of political, physical and cultural features of space and place around the world. Familiarity with major physical and political features of the world’s regions will be stressed. In addition, the course will raise various issues connected with the cultural aspect of geography, e.g., perceptions of place, changes in space over time, the interactions of human communities, the natural environment and patterns of human presence on the land.

  
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    PSC 295 - Electoral Politics Field Experience

    (2 credits, alternate years, consult department) (American politics)
    This course provides an opportunity to explore elections as the central mechanism of democratic accountability in American government, by means of supervised reading and reflective involvement in an election campaign.

    Note: Graded on a pass/no pass basis.

    Prerequisite: PSC101 or 201.

  
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    PSC 310x - Themes in Political Theory

    (4 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    A critical analysis of classical and contemporary political theories, both secular and Christian. Special consideration is given to the issue of the relation between political philosophy and the practice of political science.

    Prerequisite: junior class standing, or permission of the instructor.

    Cross-Referenced: Cross-referenced in philosophy.
  
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    PSC 320 - Christians and the Political Order

    (4 credits, alternate years, consult department) (American politics)
    This course centers on the implications of the Christian faith for Christians in the political order. We will explore historical and current Christian interpretations of the role of government in society, distilling biblical values which undergird them.

    Prerequisite: junior standing, or permission of the instructor.

  
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    PSC 325x - American Political Thought

    (4 credits, non-yearly, consult department) (American politics)
    A survey of the historical development of American political thought with attention to significant American political thinkers from the colonial period to the present. Special emphasis will be given to the uneasy relationship between liberalism and democracy and the interaction between American political institutions and culture.

    Cross-Referenced: Cross-referenced in history.
  
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    PSC 330 - Topics in International Problems

    (2-4 credits, non-yearly, consult department)
    This course explores a particular problem in international politics, using descriptive, theoretical and normative perspectives. Issues addressed may include war, ethics and foreign policy, and hunger. We will explore relevant Christian thinking to assess proposed solutions.

    Note: May be taken more than once provided a different topic is studied.

  
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    PSC 340 - Topics in American Politics and Institutions

    (2 credits, non-yearly, consult department) (American politics)
    An examination and analysis of one of the following three aspects of the American political system: the presidency, the Congress or political behavior. The latter consists of voting behavior and the role, character and political strength of interest groups and political parties. Each time the course is taught the student will be offered an opportunity to increase his or her understanding of one of these critical components of the American political system.

    Note: May be taken more than once provided a different topic is studied.

  
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    PSC 350 - Special Topics

    (2 or 4 credits, non-yearly, consult department)
    A study of political themes or issues not fully covered in other courses in response to student or faculty interests.

    Note: May be taken more than once, provided a different topic is studied.

  
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    PSC 398 - Directed Study


  
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    PSC 417 - Internship

    (4 credits may apply toward the major)
  
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    PSC 499 - Honors Research


  
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    PSY 111 - General Psychology

    (4 credits)
    General Education Requirement / Option: (general education option under social science)

    This course is an overview of the field of psychology and includes topics such as biological bases of behavior, learning and memory, motivation and emotion, human development, personality, intelligence, abnormal behavior and therapy. The course emphasizes methodologies including observation, correlational and experimental as they are used in the study of psychology. A major purpose is to have the student struggle with the question, “What is psychology?” Finally, this course provides students with the necessary background in psychology to move on to other more advanced topics in the field.

  
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    PSY 214x - Social Psychology

    (4 credits)
    This course involves the study of the way individuals think about, influence and relate to one another. Topics include: attitude change, social thinking, conformity, obedience, persuasion, prejudice, aggression, altruism, roles, norms and environmental influences on social behavior. The major aim of the course is to encourage an appreciation of the relationship between personal and situational determinants of social behavior.

    Prerequisite: PSY111, 221, or SOC101.

    Cross-Referenced: Cross-referenced in sociology.
  
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    PSY 215 - Research Design and Introductory Statistics

    (4 credits)
    This course acquaints the student with basic empirical research techniques in the behavioral sciences including political science, psychology, social work and sociology. The course aims to enable the student to function as a conductor and a consumer of behavioral science research. Techniques include: observation, questionnaire and survey, interview, single-subject designs, qualitative research, and experimental and quasi-experimental methodologies. Topics include: descriptive and basic inferential statistics, sampling methods and research ethics.

    Prerequisites: PSY111, SOC101, PSC101, or PSC105, and fulfillment of the general education math requirement.

  
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    PSY 216 - Research Design and Advanced Statistics

    (4 credits)
    Skills in statistical analysis and interpretation of psychological research are developed in this course with emphasis on correlation, regression and analysis of variance. Basic skills learned in Research Methods I are extended through practice in conducting, analyzing and reporting research using statistical software such as SPSS.

    Prerequisite: PSY215.

  
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    PSY 221 - Developmental Psychology: Childhood

    (4 credits)
    General Education Requirement / Option: (general education option under social science)

    The study of the physical and mental development of the child from the prenatal period into adolescence. The course includes the study of physical, cognitive, moral, social and personality development of childhood and adolescence.

  
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    PSY 224 - Developmental Psychology: Adolescence

    (4 credits)
    Adolescents experience many changes in a few short years as they transition from childhood to adulthood. This course explores the major psychological issues and theories in adolescent development with emphasis on cognitive development, self-concept, peer relationships and sexuality, among others.

  
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    PSY 225 - Developmental Psychology: Adulthood

    (4 credits)
    This course explores psychological issues and theories in normal adult development, with emphasis on cognitive, social and personality functioning from young adulthood to old age.

  
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    PSY 230 - Industrial/Organizational Psychology

    (2 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    This course covers the psychological issues of the work place such as personnel selection and development, organizational psychology and the work environment. The professional activities of I/O psychologists are examined including selection and the placement of new employees, staff training and development, performance management, organizational development, analysis of the quality of work life and ergonomics.

  
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    PSY 240 - Helping Skills

    (2 credits; alternate years, consult department)
    This course provides a first exposure to the practice of counseling/helping. A major emphasis will be the skilled helper model, an introductory model of active helping/counseling. This model focuses on helping clients understand and manage their problems and develop their unused opportunities and resources. Students will learn and practice the skilled helper model in a workshop setting that requires a great deal of active participation, self-reflection, journaling, and listening to peers in pseudo-counseling role-plays.

    Prerequisites: PSY111 or PSY221.

  
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    PSY 260 - Psychology of Personality

    (4 credits)
    Includes theories about the dynamics and structure of personality and current research on personality. The course emphasizes psychoanalytic, trait, humanistic and behavioral views of personality.

    Prerequisites: PSY111, 221, or both PSY224 and 225.

  
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    PSY 315 - Learning and Cognition

    (4 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    An introduction to the topics of learning, memory and cognition within the field of experimental psychology. An emphasis will be placed on approaching problems as an “experimental psychologist.” Advantages and limitations of the experimental approach and applications of the knowledge base of experimental psychology will be highlighted.

    Prerequisites: PSY111 and 215.

  
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    PSY 319 - Motivation and Emotion

    (4 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    Why do we do what we do? How do we know what we want and what we need? How do we set goals for ourselves and act to achieve them? These are some of the questions that the psychology of motivation and emotion attempt to answer. This course will examine universal and specific motivations and emotions in the context of physiological, cognitive and affective systems. It will also pursue applications of motivation and emotion to the psychology of addiction, health, coping and optimal functioning.

    Prerequisites: PSY111 and 215.

  
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    PSY 360 - Psychopathology

    (4 credits)
    This course will provide a broad survey of what is considered to be disordered in behavior, emotional expression, and cognition in adults. Emphasis will be placed on a scientific view of psychopathology. The two main foci of the course are the (a) description of various behaviors, symptoms, syndromes and illnesses as described in the most recent edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM) of the American Psychiatric Association, and (b) research and theories concerning etiology including discussion of environmental, biological, social and interactive perspectives. While intervention and childhood disorders will be discussed, they are not the primary focus of this course.

    Prerequisite: 4 credits of psychology courses.

  
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    PSY 390 - Psychology Seminar

    (2 or 4 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    A study of a selected topic.

    Note: The course may be repeated on different topics for a total of 8 credits.

    Prerequisites: PSY111 and four additional credits in psychology.

  
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    PSY 398 - Directed Study


  
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    PSY 402 - Introduction to Clinical Psychology

    (4 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    This course provides a first exposure to the theory and practice of clinical psychology. A major emphasis will be a review of the various theories of psychotherapy. The way in which these theories are applied within professional psychology constitutes a secondary, but strong, emphasis.

    Prerequisites: PSY111 and eight additional credits in psychology.

  
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    PSY 405 - History and Systems of Psychology

    (4 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    This course is one of the senior capstones to the psychology major. It is an overview of the history and theories which have shaped contemporary psychology. Particular attention is given to the assumptions and presuppositions underlying the discipline, as well as the nature of the discipline and the ways in which thoughtful Christians can integrate their faith with psychological theory and method.

    Prerequisite: 12 credits of psychology courses and at least junior status.

  
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    PSY 406 - Psychology Research Lab

    (4 credits)
    As a culminating experience, senior students conduct a semester-long empirical research project and produce an APA-formatted report. This is substantive project that allows the student to individually explore a self-selected research topic in depth and to experience the research process from initial idea to finished publication-ready manuscript. It challenges the student to think creatively, to integrate knowledge and skills obtained throughout the psychology curriculum, and to produce a worthwhile contribution to the field.

    Prerequisites: 20 credits of psychology courses including PSY215 and 216.

  
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    PSY 417 - Internship

    (4 credits may apply toward the major)
  
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    PSY 418 - Christ and Psychology

    (4 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    This course is one of the senior capstones to the psychology major. The course challenges thoughtful Christians to be critical but genuinely appreciative of the increasing role psychology is playing in modern life. A sizeable literature has developed which focuses on the relationship between orthodox evangelical Christianity and the formal discipline of psychology. The course examines some of this literature and asks: How can a scientific psychology be compatible with a person-oriented Christianity? How can Christians integrate their faith with psychological theory and methods?

    Prerequisite: 12 credits of psychology courses and at least junior status.

  
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    PSY 420 - Directed Research

    (1-4 credits)
    Directed research involves students in research projects conducted under the supervision of department faculty.

    Note: Encouraged for those students with expectations of graduate study. With the approval of the department, students may register for more than one semester.

    Prerequisites: 8 credits of psychology, approval of the research director and the department chair.

  
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    PSY 499 - Honors Research


  
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    REL 110 - Introduction to Biblical Studies

    (4 credits)
    General Education Requirement / Option: (general education requirement under biblical and theological studies)

    This course is an introduction to the historical, literary and theological aspects of the Bible. The course surveys the central characters and events of biblical history, examines the variety of literary genres found in the Bible, and discusses key theological themes emphasized within the Bible. Students are introduced to methods of biblical criticism and interpretation that integrate skills developed in other disciplines. The entire Bible (both Old and New Testaments) is covered.

    Note: Does not count toward a religion major or minor.

  
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    REL 210 - Christian Spirituality

    2
  
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    REL 260 - Christian Ethics

    (2 credits, offered at the discretion of the department, consult department)
    A biblically based, theologically and historically informed study of both personal and social moral issues from a Christian perspective.

  
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    REL 262 - Introduction to Christian Theology

    (4 credits)
    General Education Requirement / Option: (general education requirement under biblical and theological studies)

    A survey of the major concepts of Christian theology, including the doctrines of Revelation, God, Christ, the Holy Spirit, Humanity, Salvation, the Church, and Last Things. While taught from a Reformed and evangelical perspective, students will be introduced to a variety of other theological viewpoints and Christian traditions.

    Note: Does not count toward religion major or minor.

    Prerequisite: REL110.

  
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    REL 280 - History of Christianity

    (4 credits)
    A survey of the development of Christianity from the apostolic period to the contemporary world. Themes examined will include the separation of Church and Synagogue, Christianity in the Roman Empire, ecumenical councils, missionary expansion of the church in Europe and Asia, monasticism, the church in the High Middle Ages, the Protestant and Catholic Reformations, Confessionalism and the Wars of Religion, Puritanism, Pietism, The Enlightenment, Christianity and European Colonialism, Revivalism, Modernism and Evangelicalism, modern missionary expansion, the ecumenical movement, and Christianity as a global religion.

  
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    REL 290 - Christian Witness

    (4 credits)
    An examination of Christian witness as verbal proclamation (evangelism), as reasoned response (apologetics), as a distinctive lifestyle and as the practice of social justice.

    Prerequisite: REL262

  
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    REL 294 - Introduction to Christian Missions

    (2 credits)
    A general overview of the biblical foundations and historical evolution of Christian mission, with special emphasis upon the modern development of mission theory and practice.

    Prerequisite: REL262

  
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    REL 295 - Intercultural Communication

    (2 credits)
    Christian ministry and mission is essentially an ongoing process of interacting effectively with others in ways appropriate to one’s message and global/local contexts. By providing a progressively integrated understanding of intercultural issues, this course will enable students to apply principles of communication through their particular vocation or ministry so that they connect theory with models and practice to appropriately communicate the Gospel message across cultures and micro-cultures.

  
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    REL 310 - Christian Spirituality

    (2 credits)
    A study of the meaning, purpose and practices of Christian spirituality as this has been understood in the Christian tradition. The course emphasizes the practice of spiritual disciplines and the relevance of spirituality in our contemporary world.

    Prerequisite: REL262.

  
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    REL 317 - Topics in Old Testament Studies

    (2 credits)
    A study of a single book or larger section of the Old Testament or a current area of critical inquiry concerning the Old Testament. Possible topics include, but are not limited to, the Pentateuch, the Historical Writings, the Prophets, and the Poetic and Wisdom books.

    Note: May be taken more than once provided a different topic is studied.

    Prerequisites: REL110 and sophomore class standing.

  
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    REL 322 - Topics in New Testament Studies

    (2 credits)
    A study of a single book or larger section of the New Testament or a current area of critical inquiry concerning the New Testament. Possible topics include the Synoptic Gospels, the Book of Acts, the Johannine Literature, the Epistolary Literature, the Apocalypse.

    Note: May be taken more than once provided a different topic is studied.

    Prerequisite: REL110 and sophomore class standing.

  
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    REL 328 - Biblical Interpretation and Theology

    (4 credits)
    An examination of the past and present methods and proposals for biblical interpretation and biblical theology. The course will analyze and critique various models for hermeneutics and theological interpretation and also assist students in constructing exegetical methods that are biblically based, theologically informed and culturally relevant.

    Prerequisite: REL110.

  
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    REL 370 - Calvin and Calvinism

    (4 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    A study of John Calvin’s INSTITUTES OF THE CHRISTIAN RELIGION, as well as a survey of other varieties of Reformed theology, including later Calvinism.

    Prerequisite: REL262

  
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    REL 375 - Topics in Theology

    (4 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    A study of one or more standard areas of theology, (such as the doctrines of Revelation, God, Christ, the Holy Spirit, Humanity, Salvation, the Church, and Last Things) from a classical as well as a contemporary perspective.

    Note: The course may be repeated for credit provided a different topic is studied.

    Prerequisites: REL110 and 262.

  
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    REL 382 - Religion in America

    (4 credits)
    Focusing on the Christian tradition, this course will examine the individual, institutions, movements and faith traditions which have shaped and contributed to the American religious experience. To understand both the variety of and unity within the pluralist religious landscape, the course will seek to evaluate the interrelationship between religion and the broader social, cultural and political aspects of the American experience.

  
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    REL 384 - Topics in the History of Christianity

    (2 credits, offered on demand or discretion of department, consult department)
    A historical study of a religious group, theological movement or important leader in the history of the Christian church.

    Note: This course may be repeated for credit provided a different topic is studied.

  
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    REL 385 - Topics in Religion

    (2-4 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    A study of an interdisciplinary area of religion, not sufficiently covered by other courses, in response to student or faculty interests.

    Note: This course may be repeated for credit provided a different topic is studied.

    Prerequisite: REL262 or permission of instructor.

  
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    REL 390 - World Religions

    (4 credits)
    General Education Requirement / Option: (general education option under cross-cultural studies)

    The major religions of India, East Asia and the Middle East are examined in the light of the Christian faith. This course emphasizes the interaction of religion and culture with a view to cross-cultural understanding. In-depth research into a specific culture and religion is required.

  
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    REL 392 - Topics in Missiology

    (4 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    A topical and selective study of major missiological themes, permitting students to read and reflect intensively upon the nature and challenge of Christian mission. Topics will vary from year to year. Sample topics might include Religious Conversion, The Finality of Christ in a Pluralistic World, Interfaith Dialogue, Contextualization, Women in Mission Yesterday and Today.

    Note: This course may be repeated for credit provided a different topic is studied.

    Prerequisite: REL294 or permission of instructor.

  
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    REL 398 - Directed Study


  
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    REL 417 - Internship

    (2 credits may apply toward the major)
  
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    REL 472 - Senior Seminar in Religion

    (4 credits)
    A research seminar in which students will explore contemporary questions and issues in light of the Christian religious and theological tradition. Features the writing and presentation of a major paper, discussions, analysis and critique of research.

    Prerequisites:REL110, 262 and senior class standing.

  
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    REL 499 - Honors Research


  
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    SOC 101 - Principles of Sociology

    (4 credits)
    General Education Requirement / Option: (general education option under social science)

    An introduction to sociology, its major concepts, tools and perspectives. This course provides an understanding of societies, of culture, of major social institutions such as the family, religion, and education, of social inequality, and of social change.

  
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    SOC 202 - Social Problems

    (4 credits)
    This course is about learning to critically think about society and various problems in society. This course will examine a number of social issues as we wrestle with how we can decide if an issue is a social problem, decide which social problems might be more significant than others, and evaluate potential solutions for social problems. We are going to wrestle with some challenging questions with the goal of helping us to think deeply about how we might seek justice on an individual level and within society.

  
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    SOC 210 - Marriage and Family

    (4 credits)
    This class employs the sociological imagination to think about what “family” is and how the social world has shaped both families and the images and ideals that suggest what families or marriage should be. This class will use the tools of sociology to think critically about “family” as a social institution. We will wrestles with various ways of defining what family is, work to understand how families are shaped by the social world, and ask if using the sociological imagination can help us to look at current debates about family in a new and productive way.

  
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    SOC 214x - Social Psychology

    (4 credits)
    This course involves the study of the way individuals think about, influence and relate to one another. Topics include: attitude change, social thinking, conformity, obedience, persuasion, prejudice, aggression, altruism, roles, norms and environmental influences on social behavior. The major aim of the course is to encourage an appreciation of the relationship between personal and situational determinants of social behavior.

    Prerequisite: PSY111, 221, or SOC101.

    Cross-Referenced: Cross-referenced in psychology.
  
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    SOC 218 - Deviance and Social Control

    (4 credits)
    In this course, we are going to explore a number of questions about the boundaries of acceptability within societies. Instead of just taking such boundaries for granted, we will look at how the creation of normality and deviance is a process of social construction. We will examine how society can influence or constrain people to live within or outside of the socially constructed boundaries. As we explore this subject, we will be challenged to reexamine our own understanding of what is deviant and what is normal, to reflect on how definitions of deviance shape our identities and values, and to wrestle with how definitions of deviance and attempts at social control affect others.

  
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    SOC 272 - Selected Topics in Sociology

    (2 or 4 credits, non-yearly, consult department)
    A study of selected topics in sociology which are not adequately covered in other courses. Offered as a response to student or faculty needs or interests. Possible topics include: social change, social reform movements, the sociology of unconventional lifestyles, sociology of women, sociology of education, medical sociology, sociology of war and terrorism, and native American issues.

    Note: May be taken more than once provided a different topic is studied.

  
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    SOC 280 - Service and Social Change

    (4 credits)
    Some of the most troubling aspects of society are also the most persistent. In fact, social problems frequently seem “too big” to address. Yet, we also know that people are sometimes successful in reducing human suffering and reconciling social injustices. This course examines how they do so. The readings and class discussions will critically examine three questions: What motivates altruism and social engagement? What strategies do groups use to address human needs or to transform cultural and structural patterns? What is the potential of these efforts for creating meaningful, lasting change in society?

  
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    SOC 290 - Cultural Anthropology

    (4 credits)
    General Education Requirement / Option: (general education option under social science or cross-cultural studies. Cannot count toward meeting both requirements)

    This course is about learning a way of seeing and understanding other cultures and our own culture(s) - introducing and drawing on ideas and insights from the field of Cultural Anthropology. In a globalizing and increasingly interconnected world these ideas and insights can serve a critical need in helping us understand and learn how to live in with cultural diversity and complexity. Thus the value of this course is in learning a new way of seeing and understanding, a way that helps us think about what it means to be human, a way that helps us understand and live with our neighbors - locally and globally.

  
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    SOC 303 - The Criminal Justice System

    (4 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    A study of the development of, issues in, and new directions for, the American criminal justice system. Each step of the system is critiqued in terms of intended and unintended consequences as well as official and operative goals, and is related to a detailed discussion of various correctional treatment programs: prisons, halfway houses, group homes, community-based treatment programs, probation, parole and others. Those in the criminal justice career concentration should take SOC218 first.

  
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    SOC 304 - Ethnicity, Power and Identity

    (4 credits)
    General Education Requirement / Option: (general education option under cross-cultural studies)

    This course examines and develops a sociological perspective on ethnicity, power and identity. The primary goal of this course is not simply to learn the attitudes or behaviors of specific racial groups. Instead, this course will seek to answer the questions: Where do social groups come from? What social dynamics emerge when one group of people has much more power than another? Our readings and discussions will shed light upon these questions from different perspectives. Along the way, we will also discuss the unique historical situations of specific groups as they endure and struggle against power imbalances (for example, the African American Civil Rights Movement).

  
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    SOC 307 - Corrections

    (4 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    Evolution of and debates concerning community and non-community based correctional programs, relationships between correcting, reforming, rehabilitating, and punishing, tensions between protection of public safety and rights of the accused, evaluation of incarceration, probation, parole, diversion, alternate and restorative justice programs, issues in “proactive” and “reactive” debate.

    Prerequisites: SOC218 and 303.

  
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    SOC 309 - Sociology of Gender

    (4 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    An examination of the topic of gender, predominately using a sociological perspective. The study of gender from a sociological perspective develops an appreciation for how social structure, institutions and culture shape gender roles and the lives of those who play these roles - at the same time that gender roles shape culture, institutions and social structure. Attention will also be given to the “inherent or constructed” debate about gender roles, the role of the media in shaping gender, and the intertwining of gender and family, politics, work and religion.

  
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    SOC 312 - Sociology of Religion

    (4 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    This course examines sociological perspectives on religion in a changing and globalized society. The course readings and discussion will focus on three questions: What is “religion”? What is the relationship between modernity and religiosity? How does one’s social position shape his or her experience of religiosity? The course will encourage students to reflect upon the relationship between sociological insights and their own experiences of religion.

  
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    SOC 317x - American Indian Societies and Cultures

    (4 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    General Education Requirement / Option: (general education option under cross-cultural studies)

    This course surveys the historical development of American Indian peoples, particularly during the period of contact and conquest by Euro-Americans and particularly in the trans-Mississippi West region of what became the U.S. Topics include pre-contact life, oral literature, Indian accommodation and selective adaptation to Euro-American societies, Spanish, French and U.S. Indian policies, Native American religion, Christian mission work among American Indians, activism by and on behalf of American Indians, and reservation life.

    Cross-Referenced: Cross-referenced in history.
  
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    SOC 340 - Sociological Research

    (4 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    A comprehensive introduction to sociological research methods with emphasis on survey research. An opportunity for sociology majors or others to apply this methodology in the conduct of major research in an area determined in consultation with the instructor. Finished research reports will be considered for presentation at various sociological association meetings.

    Prerequisites: SOC101 or equivalent.

  
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    SOC 341x - Philosophy of Social Science

    (4 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    An in-depth study of the philosophical foundations of the social and cognitive sciences. Issues discussed include, e.g., a) laws and explanations in social science, b) objectivity and values in the social sciences, c) rationality, d) relations between different social sciences and the physical sciences, e) philosophy of mind.

    Prerequisites: at least one philosophy course. PHI202 or 342 may prove helpful, but not required.

    Cross-Referenced: Cross-referenced in philosophy.
  
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    SOC 351 - Ethnographic Research

    (4 credits)
    An overview of ethnographic methods, goals, and the theoretical assumptions underlying them. Ethnography, the description and analysis of human life or culture, is based on qualitative fieldwork. The goal is to understand the “native’s” point of view, to learn from people rather than study them. Students will have an opportunity to practice fieldwork methods and write a brief ethnography.

    Note: Preceding course recommendation: SOC290.

  
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    SOC 398 - Directed Study


  
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    SOC 401 - Sociological Theory

    (4 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    The study of major theories and theorists, addressing such theories as functionalist, conflict, social exchange, symbolic interactionist, ethnomethodological/ phenomenological, and sociobiology. Emphasis is placed on how various perspectives impact and alter our understanding of reality, of causation, of the past, present and future.

    Prerequisites: SOC101, sociology major or permission of instructor.

  
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    SOC 417 - Internship

    (4 credits may apply toward the major)
  
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    SOC 499 - Honors Research


  
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    SPA 101 - Beginning Spanish Language and Culture

    (3 credits)
    Combined study of language and culture. Study of major social systems and themes of Hispanic culture. Elementary study of the language in a communicative context. Emphasis upon integration of developing language skills with cultural understanding and sensitivity in oral communication settings.

    Prerequisite: No previous study of Spanish, or placement by the foreign language placement exam.

  
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    SPA 102 - Beginning Spanish Language and Culture

    (3 credits)
    Combined study of language and culture. Study of major social systems and themes of Hispanic culture. Building on previously acquired ability in Spanish, elementary study of the language in a communicative context. Emphasis upon integration of developing language skills with cultural understanding and sensitivity in oral communication settings.

    Prerequisite: SPA101, or placement by the foreign language placement exam.

  
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    SPA 201 - Intermediate Spanish Language and Culture

    (3 credits)
    General Education Requirement / Option: (general education option under language)

    Combined study of intermediate language and culture. Study of primary sources in print, audio and visual forms to develop appreciation for the ways culture in general and the language’s culture in particular shape a variety of social contexts. Building on previously acquired ability in Spanish, continued study of language in a communicative context with considerable emphasis upon precision and expansion of linguistic skills.

    Prerequisite: SPA102, or placement by the foreign language placement exam.

  
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    SPA 202 - Intermediate Spanish Language and Culture

    (3 credits)
    Combined study of intermediate language and culture. Study of primary sources in print, audio and visual forms to develop appreciation for the ways culture in general and the language’s culture in particular shape a variety of social contexts. Building on previously acquired ability in Spanish, continued study of language in a communicative context with considerable emphasis upon precision and expansion of linguistic skills.

    Prerequisite: SPA201, or placement by the foreign language placement exam.

  
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    SPA 311 - Advanced Spanish Conversation

    (1 credit)
    The main goal of this course is to improve oral communication, which includes speaking as well as listening, comprehension. Since successful communication also involves cultural awareness of the Spanish speaker’s feelings, thoughts and attitudes, part of this course involves studying sources of these important underlying constructs.

    Note: Taught in Spanish. Course repeated a minimum of 3 semesters. Graded on a pass/no pass basis.

    Prerequisite: SPA202 or equivalent proficiency.

  
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    SPA 312 - Advanced Grammar and Composition

    (3 credits)
    Advanced development of writing skills and a review of difficult grammar concepts. Students will be expected to write in a variety of contexts. Emphasis will be on the writing process. The majority of the assignments will be completed in steps including multiple drafts. Additionally, students will be expected to review grammar and complete some grammar exercises.

    Note: Taught in Spanish.

    Prerequisite: SPA202 or equivalent proficiency.

  
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    SPA 314 - Introduction to Reading Hispanic Literature

    (3 credits)
    Advanced development of reading skills and strategies and an introduction to Hispanic literature and literary topics. Students will learn how to effectively read a literary text in Spanish. Attention will be paid to strategies for understanding context through vocabulary and grammar recognition. Additionally students will be introduced to the literary genres and cultural contexts of the texts they study as well as pertinent critical commentary.

    Note: Taught in Spanish.

    Prerequisite: SPA202 or equivalent proficiency.

  
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    SPA 326 - The Sounds of Spanish

    (3 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    An in-depth study of Spanish phonetics. Topics include techniques and rules of Spanish articulation, analysis of the sounds of vowels and consonants in Spanish and their differences from English pronunciation, syllabication, rhythm, stress, pitch and intonation.

    Note: Taught in Spanish.

    Prerequisites: SPA202 and one 3-credit 300-level course.

  
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    SPA 327 - Hispanics in the United States

    (3 credits, alternate years, consult department)
    A wide-ranging study of the current situation of Hispanics in the United States. After an historical overview, a thematic approach will be taken to better understand the role of Hispanics in the United States and their growing influence. Possible topics include demographics, voting tendencies, purchasing power, Hispanic media, religion, labor laws, immigration, Spanglish and bilingualism, among others. Using interviews and research, the course will conclude with a study of our Hispanic neighbors here in northwest Iowa.

    Note: Taught in Spanish.

    Prerequisites: SPA202 and one 3-credit 300-level course.

 

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